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Negative selection maintains transcription factor binding motifs in human cancer

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Genomics, June 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (70th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (66th percentile)

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters

Citations

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11 Dimensions

Readers on

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46 Mendeley
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Title
Negative selection maintains transcription factor binding motifs in human cancer
Published in
BMC Genomics, June 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12864-016-2728-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ilya E. Vorontsov, Grigory Khimulya, Elena N. Lukianova, Daria D. Nikolaeva, Irina A. Eliseeva, Ivan V. Kulakovskiy, Vsevolod J. Makeev

Abstract

Somatic mutations in cancer cells affect various genomic elements disrupting important cell functions. In particular, mutations in DNA binding sites recognized by transcription factors can alter regulator binding affinities and, consequently, expression of target genes. A number of promoter mutations have been linked with an increased risk of cancer. Cancer somatic mutations in binding sites of selected transcription factors have been found under positive selection. However, action and significance of negative selection in non-coding regions remain controversial. Here we present analysis of transcription factor binding motifs co-localized with non-coding variants. To avoid statistical bias we account for mutation signatures of different cancer types. For many transcription factors, including multiple members of FOX, HOX, and NR families, we show that human cancers accumulate fewer mutations than expected by chance that increase or decrease affinity of predicted binding sites. Such stability of binding motifs is even more exhibited in DNase accessible regions. Our data demonstrate negative selection against binding sites alterations and suggest that such selection pressure protects cancer cells from rewiring of regulatory circuits. Further analysis of transcription factors with conserved binding motifs can reveal cell regulatory pathways crucial for the survivability of various human cancers.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 46 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 2%
Italy 1 2%
Unknown 44 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 17%
Student > Master 7 15%
Student > Bachelor 6 13%
Researcher 4 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 9%
Other 9 20%
Unknown 8 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 13 28%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 13 28%
Computer Science 6 13%
Engineering 2 4%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 4%
Other 1 2%
Unknown 9 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 July 2016.
All research outputs
#1,836,667
of 8,029,393 outputs
Outputs from BMC Genomics
#1,538
of 5,731 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#76,471
of 263,008 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Genomics
#61
of 190 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,029,393 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 76th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,731 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,008 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 190 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.