↓ Skip to main content

Clinical and microbiological implications of invasive pneumococcal disease in hospitalized patients (1998–2013)

Overview of attention for article published in Brazilian Journal of Infectious Diseases, April 2016
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
4 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
69 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Clinical and microbiological implications of invasive pneumococcal disease in hospitalized patients (1998–2013)
Published in
Brazilian Journal of Infectious Diseases, April 2016
DOI 10.1016/j.bjid.2016.01.011
Pubmed ID
Authors

Medeiros, Marta Inês Cazentini, de Moura Negrini, Bento Vidal, Maria E Silva, Jorgete, Almeida, Samanta Cristine Grassi, Leopoldo, Maria Luiza, Guerra, Silva, de Andrade, Denise

Abstract

Infections caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) still represent a challenge for health systems around the world. The objective of this study was to assess microbiological and clinical aspects in hospitalized patients with invasive pneumococcus disease (IPD) between 1998 and 2013. This was a retrospective study that analyzed the results of pneumococcus identification, serotyping, and susceptibility testing found in the Adolfo Lutz Institute databank. Personal variables, medical history and clinical outcome of patients admitted with invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) were analyzed. These were obtained from records of a public teaching hospital - Hospital das Clínicas Faculdade de Medicina Ribeirão Preto. The sample comprised 332 patients. Patient age ranged from less than one month to 89 years old (mean 20.3 years) and the sample was predominately male. Pneumonia (67.8%) was the most common IPD, accounting for 18.2% of deaths. Serotypes 14, 1, 3, 9V, 6B, 6A, 23F, 19A, 18C, 19F, 12F, and 4 were the most common (75.3%). Most patients, or 67.5%, were cured without any complication (success), 6.9% had some type of sequela (failure), and 25.6% died (failure). In the case of deaths due to meningitis, strains of fully penicillin-resistant pneumococcus were isolated. Furthermore, 68.2% of patients who died presented some type of comorbidity. The 60 and older age group presented the most significant association (OR=4.2), with outcome failure regardless of the presence of comorbidity. Serotype 18C was the most significant risk factor both in raw analysis (OR=3.8) and when adjusted for comorbidity (OR=5.0) or age (OR=5.4). The same occurred with serotype 12F (respectively, OR=5.1, OR=5.0, and OR=4.7). The present findings highlight the importance of IPD among young adults and older adults. In the era of conjugate vaccines, monitoring serotypes in different age groups is essential to assess the impact and adequacy of immunization.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 69 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 1 1%
Unknown 68 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 13 19%
Researcher 11 16%
Student > Bachelor 11 16%
Student > Postgraduate 6 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 7%
Other 12 17%
Unknown 11 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 35 51%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 7%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 3%
Other 7 10%
Unknown 14 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 June 2016.
All research outputs
#17,314,471
of 21,431,229 outputs
Outputs from Brazilian Journal of Infectious Diseases
#446
of 629 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#199,925
of 276,802 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Brazilian Journal of Infectious Diseases
#12
of 16 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,431,229 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 629 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.6. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 276,802 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 16 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.