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Elucidation of Taste- and Odor-Producing Bacteria and Toxigenic Cyanobacteria in a Midwestern Drinking Water Supply Reservoir by Shotgun Metagenomic Analysis

Overview of attention for article published in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, June 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
10 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

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13 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
54 Mendeley
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Title
Elucidation of Taste- and Odor-Producing Bacteria and Toxigenic Cyanobacteria in a Midwestern Drinking Water Supply Reservoir by Shotgun Metagenomic Analysis
Published in
Applied and Environmental Microbiology, June 2016
DOI 10.1128/aem.01334-16
Pubmed ID
Authors

Timothy G. Otten, Jennifer L. Graham, Theodore D. Harris, Theo W. Dreher

Abstract

While commonplace in clinical settings, DNA based assays for identification or enumeration of drinking water pathogens and other biological contaminants remain widely unadopted by the monitoring community. In this study, shotgun metagenomics was used to identify taste-and-odor producers and toxin-producing cyanobacteria over a 2-year period in a drinking water reservoir. The sequencing data implicated several cyanobacteria, including: Anabaena sp., Microcystis sp. and an unresolved member of the family Oscillatoriales as the likely principal producers of geosmin, microcystin and 2-methylisoborneol (MIB), respectively. To further demonstrate this, quantitative PCR assays targeting geosmin-producing Anabaena and microcystin-producing Microcystis were utilized, and these data were fitted using generalized linear models and compared with routine monitoring data including: microscopic cell counts, sonde-based physicochemical analyses and assays of all inorganic and organic nitrogen and phosphorus forms and fractions. The QPCR assays explained the greatest variation in observed geosmin (Adj. R(2)=0.71) and microcystin (Adj. R(2)=0.84) concentrations over the study period, highlighting their potential for routine monitoring applications. The origin of the monoterpene cyclase required for MIB biosynthesis was putatively linked to a periphytic cyanobacterial mat attached to the concrete drinking water inflow structure. We conclude that shotgun metagenomics can be used to identify microbial agents involved in water quality deterioration and to guide PCR assay selection or design for routine monitoring purposes. Finally, we offer estimates of microbial diversity and metagenomic coverage of our datasets for reference to others wishing to apply shotgun metagenomics to other lacustrine systems. Cyanobacterial toxins and microbial taste-and-odor compounds are a growing concern for drinking water utilities reliant upon surface water resources. Specific identification of the microorganism(s) responsible for water quality degradation is often complicated by the presence of co-occurring taxa capable of producing these undesirable metabolites. Here we present a framework for how shotgun metagenomics can be used to definitively identify problematic microorganisms, and how these data can guide the development of rapid genetic assays for routine monitoring purposes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 54 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 2 4%
Denmark 1 2%
Unknown 51 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 22%
Researcher 11 20%
Student > Master 11 20%
Unspecified 5 9%
Student > Bachelor 5 9%
Other 10 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 16 30%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 14 26%
Unspecified 9 17%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 13%
Engineering 3 6%
Other 5 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 15. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 August 2016.
All research outputs
#963,440
of 12,692,775 outputs
Outputs from Applied and Environmental Microbiology
#568
of 9,595 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#28,793
of 259,871 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Applied and Environmental Microbiology
#21
of 164 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,692,775 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,595 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 259,871 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 164 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.