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Uterine Cancer After Risk-Reducing Salpingo-oophorectomy Without Hysterectomy in Women With BRCA Mutations

Overview of attention for article published in JAMA Oncology, November 2016
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Citations

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75 Dimensions

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92 Mendeley
Title
Uterine Cancer After Risk-Reducing Salpingo-oophorectomy Without Hysterectomy in Women With BRCA Mutations
Published in
JAMA Oncology, November 2016
DOI 10.1001/jamaoncol.2016.1820
Pubmed ID
Authors

Catherine A. Shu, Malcolm C. Pike, Anjali R. Jotwani, Tara M. Friebel, Robert A. Soslow, Douglas A. Levine, Katherine L. Nathanson, Jason A. Konner, Angela G. Arnold, Faina Bogomolniy, Fanny Dao, Narciso Olvera, Elizabeth K. Bancroft, Deborah J. Goldfrank, Zsofia K. Stadler, Mark E. Robson, Carol L. Brown, Mario M. Leitao, Nadeem R. Abu-Rustum, Carol A. Aghajanian, Joanne L. Blum, Susan L. Neuhausen, Judy E. Garber, Mary B. Daly, Claudine Isaacs, Rosalind A. Eeles, Patricia A. Ganz, Richard R. Barakat, Kenneth Offit, Susan M. Domchek, Timothy R. Rebbeck, Noah D. Kauff

Abstract

The link between BRCA mutations and uterine cancer is unclear. Therefore, although risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy (RRSO) is standard treatment among women with BRCA mutations (BRCA+ women), the role of concomitant hysterectomy is controversial. To determine the risk for uterine cancer and distribution of specific histologic subtypes in BRCA+ women after RRSO without hysterectomy. This multicenter prospective cohort study included 1083 women with a deleterious BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation identified from January 1, 1995, to December 31, 2011, at 9 academic medical centers in the United States and the United Kingdom who underwent RRSO without a prior or concomitant hysterectomy. Of these, 627 participants were BRCA1+; 453, BRCA2+; and 3, both. Participants were prospectively followed up for a median 5.1 (interquartile range [IQR], 3.0-8.4) years after ascertainment, BRCA testing, or RRSO (whichever occurred last). Follow up data available through October 14, 2014, were included in the analyses. Censoring occurred at uterine cancer diagnosis, hysterectomy, last follow-up, or death. New cancers were categorized by histologic subtype, and available tumors were analyzed for loss of the wild-type BRCA gene and/or protein expression. Incidence of uterine corpus cancer in BRCA+ women who underwent RRSO without hysterectomy compared with rates expected from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database. Among the 1083 women women who underwent RRSO without hysterectomy at a median age 45.6 (IQR: 40.9 - 52.5), 8 incident uterine cancers were observed (4.3 expected; observed to expected [O:E] ratio, 1.9; 95% CI, 0.8-3.7; P = .09). No increased risk for endometrioid endometrial carcinoma or sarcoma was found after stratifying by subtype. Five serous and/or serous-like (serous/serous-like) endometrial carcinomas were observed (4 BRCA1+ and 1 BRCA2+) 7.2 to 12.9 years after RRSO (BRCA1: 0.18 expected [O:E ratio, 22.2; 95% CI, 6.1-56.9; P < .001]; BRCA2: 0.16 expected [O:E ratio, 6.4; 95% CI, 0.2-35.5; P = .15]). Tumor analyses confirmed loss of the wild-type BRCA1 gene and/or protein expression in all 3 available serous/serous-like BRCA1+ tumors. Although the overall risk for uterine cancer after RRSO was not increased, the risk for serous/serous-like endometrial carcinoma was increased in BRCA1+ women. This risk should be considered when discussing the advantages and risks of hysterectomy at the time of RRSO in BRCA1+ women.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 76 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 92 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 1%
Argentina 1 1%
Unknown 90 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 22 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 14%
Researcher 12 13%
Student > Postgraduate 8 9%
Student > Master 7 8%
Other 19 21%
Unknown 11 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 49 53%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 5%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 3%
Psychology 3 3%
Other 6 7%
Unknown 20 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 417. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 May 2017.
All research outputs
#24,933
of 13,982,298 outputs
Outputs from JAMA Oncology
#72
of 1,885 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,110
of 261,259 outputs
Outputs of similar age from JAMA Oncology
#6
of 91 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,982,298 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,885 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 84.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 261,259 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 91 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.