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Information needs of health care workers in developing countries: a literature review with a focus on Africa

Overview of attention for article published in Human Resources for Health, April 2009
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
2 blogs
twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
82 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
234 Mendeley
citeulike
4 CiteULike
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Title
Information needs of health care workers in developing countries: a literature review with a focus on Africa
Published in
Human Resources for Health, April 2009
DOI 10.1186/1478-4491-7-30
Pubmed ID
Authors

Neil Pakenham-Walsh, Frederick Bukachi

Abstract

Health care workers in developing countries continue to lack access to basic, practical information to enable them to deliver safe, effective care. This paper provides the first phase of a broader literature review of the information and learning needs of health care providers in developing countries. A Medline search revealed 1762 papers, of which 149 were identified as potentially relevant to the review. Thirty-five of these were found to be highly relevant. Eight of the 35 studies looked at information needs as perceived by health workers, patients and family/community members; 14 studies assessed the knowledge of health workers; and 8 looked at health care practice. The studies suggest a gross lack of knowledge about the basics on how to diagnose and manage common diseases, going right across the health workforce and often associated with suboptimal, ineffective and dangerous health care practices. If this level of knowledge and practice is representative, as it appears to be, it indicates that modern medicine, even at a basic level, has largely failed the majority of the world's population. The information and learning needs of family caregivers and primary and district health workers have been ignored for too long. Improving the availability and use of relevant, reliable health care information has enormous potential to radically improve health care worldwide.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 234 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Nigeria 4 2%
United States 3 1%
Tanzania, United Republic of 2 <1%
South Africa 2 <1%
India 1 <1%
Mali 1 <1%
Morocco 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Sudan 1 <1%
Other 7 3%
Unknown 211 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 50 21%
Researcher 31 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 28 12%
Student > Postgraduate 26 11%
Student > Bachelor 19 8%
Other 67 29%
Unknown 13 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 81 35%
Computer Science 36 15%
Social Sciences 31 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 21 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 12 5%
Other 38 16%
Unknown 15 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 14. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 February 2014.
All research outputs
#1,040,360
of 13,037,911 outputs
Outputs from Human Resources for Health
#121
of 700 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#9,843
of 124,910 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Human Resources for Health
#2
of 4 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,037,911 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 700 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 124,910 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 2 of them.