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Cryptic Eimeria genotypes are common across the southern but not northern hemisphere

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal for Parasitology, August 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (63rd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (58th percentile)

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages

Citations

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27 Dimensions

Readers on

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37 Mendeley
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Title
Cryptic Eimeria genotypes are common across the southern but not northern hemisphere
Published in
International Journal for Parasitology, August 2016
DOI 10.1016/j.ijpara.2016.05.006
Pubmed ID
Authors

Emily L. Clark, Sarah E. Macdonald, V. Thenmozhi, Krishnendu Kundu, Rajat Garg, Saroj Kumar, Simeon Ayoade, Kimberly M. Fornace, Isa Danladi Jatau, Abdalgader Moftah, Matthew J. Nolan, N.R. Sudhakar, A.O. Adebambo, I.A. Lawal, Ramón Álvarez Zapata, Joseph A. Awuni, H. David Chapman, Esron Karimuribo, Claire M. Mugasa, Boniface Namangala, Jonathan Rushton, Xun Suo, Kumarasamy Thangaraj, Arni S.R. Srinivasa Rao, Anup K. Tewari, Partha S. Banerjee, G. Dhinakar Raj, M. Raman, Fiona M. Tomley, Damer P. Blake

Abstract

The phylum Apicomplexa includes parasites of medical, zoonotic and veterinary significance. Understanding the global distribution and genetic diversity of these protozoa is of fundamental importance for efficient, robust and long-lasting methods of control. Eimeria spp. cause intestinal coccidiosis in all major livestock animals and are the most important parasites of domestic chickens in terms of both economic impact and animal welfare. Despite having significant negative impacts on the efficiency of food production, many fundamental questions relating to the global distribution and genetic variation of Eimeria spp. remain largely unanswered. Here, we provide the broadest map yet of Eimeria occurrence for domestic chickens, confirming that all the known species (Eimeria acervulina, Eimeria brunetti, Eimeria maxima, Eimeria mitis, Eimeria necatrix, Eimeria praecox, Eimeria tenella) are present in all six continents where chickens are found (including 21 countries). Analysis of 248 internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences derived from 17 countries provided evidence of possible allopatric diversity for species such as E. tenella (FST values ⩽0.34) but not E. acervulina and E. mitis, and highlighted a trend towards widespread genetic variance. We found that three genetic variants described previously only in Australia and southern Africa (Operational Taxonomic Units (OTU) x, y and z) have a wide distribution across the southern, but not the northern hemisphere. While the drivers for such a polarized distribution of these OTU genotypes remains unclear, the occurrence of genetically variant Eimeria may pose a risk to food security and animal welfare in Europe and North America should these parasites spread to the northern hemisphere.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 37 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 37 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 22%
Researcher 5 14%
Student > Bachelor 4 11%
Student > Master 4 11%
Lecturer 3 8%
Other 6 16%
Unknown 7 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 24%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 8 22%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 8%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 2 5%
Other 3 8%
Unknown 9 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 July 2017.
All research outputs
#6,249,326
of 12,270,130 outputs
Outputs from International Journal for Parasitology
#996
of 1,463 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#96,365
of 268,923 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal for Parasitology
#11
of 24 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,270,130 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,463 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.4. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,923 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 24 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.