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Frequent Consumption of Sugar- and Artificially Sweetened Beverages and Natural and Bottled Fruit Juices Is Associated with an Increased Risk of Metabolic Syndrome in a Mediterranean Population at…

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Nutrition, June 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
5 news outlets
twitter
64 tweeters
facebook
5 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
36 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
104 Mendeley
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Title
Frequent Consumption of Sugar- and Artificially Sweetened Beverages and Natural and Bottled Fruit Juices Is Associated with an Increased Risk of Metabolic Syndrome in a Mediterranean Population at High Cardiovascular Disease Risk
Published in
Journal of Nutrition, June 2016
DOI 10.3945/jn.116.230367
Pubmed ID
Authors

Cíntia Ferreira-Pêgo, Nancy Babio, Maira Bes-Rastrollo, Dolores Corella, Ramon Estruch, Emilio Ros, Montserrat Fitó, Lluís Serra-Majem, Fernando Arós, Miguel Fiol, José Manuel Santos-Lozano, Carlos Muñoz-Bravo, Xavier Pintó, Miguel Ruiz-Canela, Jordi Salas-Salvadó

Abstract

The relation between the consumption of sweetened beverages and metabolic syndrome (MetS) is controversial. This analysis evaluated the associations between intakes of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs), artificially sweetened beverages, and natural and bottled fruit juices and the incidence of MetS in elderly individuals at high risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and without MetS at baseline. We prospectively examined 1868 participants free of MetS at baseline from the PREDIMED (PREvención con DIeta MEDiterránea) study. MetS was defined by using the updated harmonized criteria of the International Diabetes Federation, the American Heart Association, and National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. Energy and nutrient intakes were evaluated at baseline and then yearly by using a validated 137-item food-frequency questionnaire. Multivariable-adjusted HRs for MetS and its components were estimated from mean intakes during follow-up. We compared the 2 highest consumption categories (1-5 and >5 servings/wk) with the lowest category (<1 serving/wk). A total of 930 incident cases of MetS were documented during a median follow-up of 3.24 y. When we compared consumption of >5 servings/wk with consumption of <1 serving/wk, multivariable HRs (95% CIs) for MetS incidence were 1.43 (1.00, 2.15), 1.74 (1.26, 2.41), 1.30 (1.00, 1.69), and 1.14 (1.04, 1.65) for SSBs, artificially sweetened beverages, natural fruit juices, and bottled fruit juices, respectively. The occasional consumption of SSBs and artificially sweetened beverages (1-5 servings/wk) was not associated with the incidence of MetS in middle-aged and elderly individuals at high risk of CVD. The consumption of >5 servings/wk of all of the types of beverages analyzed was associated with an increased risk of MetS and some of its components. However, for SSBs and bottled fruit juices these associations must be interpreted with caution because of the low frequency of consumption in this population. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as ISRCTN35739639.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 64 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 104 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 2 2%
New Zealand 1 <1%
Unknown 101 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 16 15%
Student > Bachelor 13 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 13%
Researcher 12 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 8%
Other 23 22%
Unknown 19 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 23 22%
Nursing and Health Professions 18 17%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 8%
Social Sciences 4 4%
Other 11 11%
Unknown 29 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 89. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 November 2020.
All research outputs
#256,568
of 16,267,753 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Nutrition
#249
of 8,405 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#7,218
of 264,447 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Nutrition
#8
of 62 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,267,753 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,405 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,447 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 62 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.