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The role of general practitioners in medical school admission interview panels in the UK (2012–2014): a national survey

Overview of attention for article published in JRSM Open, July 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#48 of 170)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (70th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (64th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
7 tweeters

Readers on

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5 Mendeley
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Title
The role of general practitioners in medical school admission interview panels in the UK (2012–2014): a national survey
Published in
JRSM Open, July 2016
DOI 10.1177/2054270416632706
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mohammed Ahmed Rashid, John Benson

Abstract

Recent primary care workforce pressures in the UK have prompted national reviews. Recommendations to increase the proportion of medical students entering general practice have led to interest in the role of medical schools in career choices. This study sought to identify the career backgrounds of admissions leads at UK medical schools and the proportion of general practitioners on admission interview panels. A national survey using a proforma circulated to all UK medical school admission leads via the Medical Schools Council. UK medical schools. UK medical schools. Prevalence of assessment lead and panel members' professional groups. Responses were received from 18 (54.5%) of the 33 UK medical schools. General practitioners led the admissions process in 2 (11%) of these. Fifteen schools were able to furnish detailed data about interview panel composition, having held a combined total of 876 distinct interview panels during the 2012-2013 and 2013-2014 admission years; 683 panels (78%) included a secondary care physician, but only 261 panels (29.8%) included general practitioners. General practitioner representation ranged from 3.8% to 100% of individual schools' panels; however, eight schools (about half the respondents able to offer numbers of participants) omitted general practitioner representation in more than half of their interview panels. Despite the UK policy focus to increase the proportion of medical students becoming general practitioners, doctors from this clinical background are not proportionately represented as admissions leads or on admissions interview panels. Increasing general practitioner involvement in admissions processes may be one way in which medical schools can support general practice as a career aspiration.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 5 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 5 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 2 40%
Researcher 2 40%
Librarian 1 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 2 40%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 20%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 20%
Engineering 1 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 January 2017.
All research outputs
#3,483,920
of 12,973,070 outputs
Outputs from JRSM Open
#48
of 170 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#76,079
of 260,016 outputs
Outputs of similar age from JRSM Open
#6
of 17 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,973,070 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 72nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 170 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 260,016 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 17 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.