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Cancer screening education: can it change knowledge and attitudes among culturally and linguistically diverse communities in Queensland, Australia?

Overview of attention for article published in Health Promotion Journal of Australia, June 2016
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (55th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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2 Dimensions

Readers on

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31 Mendeley
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Title
Cancer screening education: can it change knowledge and attitudes among culturally and linguistically diverse communities in Queensland, Australia?
Published in
Health Promotion Journal of Australia, June 2016
DOI 10.1071/he15116
Pubmed ID
Authors

Katherine Cullerton, Danielle Gallegos, Ella Ashley, Hong Do, Anna Voloschenko, MaryLou Fleming, Rebecca Ramsey, Trish Gould, Cullerton, Katherine, Gallegos, Danielle, Ashley, Ella, Do, Hong, Voloschenko, Anna, Fleming, MaryLou, Ramsey, Rebecca, Gould, Trish

Abstract

Issue addressed: Screening for cancer of the cervix, breast and bowel can reduce morbidity and mortality. Low participation rates in cancer screening have been identified among migrant communities internationally. Attempting to improve low rates of cancer screening, the Ethnic Communities Council of Queensland developed a pilot Cancer Screening Education Program for breast, bowel and cervical cancer. This study determines the impact of education sessions on knowledge, attitudes and intentions to participate in screening for culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) communities living in Brisbane, Queensland.Methods: Seven CALD groups (Arabic-speaking, Bosnian, South Asian (including Indian and Bhutanese), Samoan and Pacific Island, Spanish-speaking, Sudanese and Vietnamese) participated in a culturally-tailored cancer screening education pilot program that was developed using the Health Belief Model. A pre- and post-education evaluation session measured changes in knowledge, attitudes and intention related to breast, bowel and cervical cancer and screening. The evaluation focussed on perceived susceptibility, perceived seriousness and the target population's beliefs about reducing risk by cancer screening.Results: There were 159 participants in the three cancer screening education sessions. Overall participants' knowledge increased, some attitudes toward participation in cancer screening became more positive and intent to participate in future screening increased (n=146).Conclusion: These results indicate the importance of developing screening approaches that address the barriers to participation among CALD communities and that a culturally-tailored education program is effective in improving knowledge, attitudes about and intentions to participate in cancer screening.So what?: It is important that culturally-tailored programs are developed in conjunction with communities to improve health outcomes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 31 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 31 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 23%
Unspecified 6 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 16%
Student > Bachelor 4 13%
Researcher 4 13%
Other 5 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 9 29%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 23%
Social Sciences 4 13%
Sports and Recreations 1 3%
Other 3 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 August 2016.
All research outputs
#3,797,880
of 8,279,540 outputs
Outputs from Health Promotion Journal of Australia
#118
of 118 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#113,118
of 262,502 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Health Promotion Journal of Australia
#9
of 14 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,279,540 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 53rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 118 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 262,502 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 14 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.