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Shrinking, growing, and bursting: microfluidic equilibrium control of water-in-water droplets

Overview of attention for article published in Lab on a Chip - Miniaturisation for Chemistry & Biology, January 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (55th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (54th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

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15 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
49 Mendeley
Title
Shrinking, growing, and bursting: microfluidic equilibrium control of water-in-water droplets
Published in
Lab on a Chip - Miniaturisation for Chemistry & Biology, January 2016
DOI 10.1039/c6lc00576d
Pubmed ID
Authors

Byeong-Ui Moon, Dae Kun Hwang, Scott S. H. Tsai

Abstract

We demonstrate the dynamic control of aqueous two phase system (ATPS) droplets in shrinking, growing, and dissolving conditions. The ATPS droplets are formed passively in a flow focusing microfluidic channel, where the dextran-rich (DEX) and polyethylene glycol-rich (PEG) solutions are introduced as disperse and continuous phases, respectively. To vary the ATPS equilibrium condition, we infuse into a secondary inlet the PEG phase from a different polymer concentration ATPS. We find that the resulting alteration of the continuous PEG phase can cause droplets to shrink or grow by approximately 45 and 30%, respectively. This volume change is due to water exchange between the disperse DEX and continuous PEG phases, as the system tends towards new equilibria. We also develop a simple model, based on the ATPS binodal curve and tie lines, that predicts the amount of droplet shrinkage or growth, based on the change in the continuous phase PEG concentration. We observe a good agreement between our experimental results and the model. Additionally, we find that when the continuous phase PEG concentration is reduced such that PEG and DEX phases no longer phase separate, the ATPS droplets are dissolved into the continuous phase. We apply this method to controllably release encapsulated microparticles and cells, and we find that their release occurs within 10 seconds. Our approach uses the dynamic equilibrium of ATPS to control droplet size along the microfluidic channel. By modulating the ATPS equilibrium, we are able to shrink, grow, and dissolve ATPS droplets in situ. We anticipate that this approach may find utility in many biomedical settings, for example, in drug and cell delivery and release applications.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 49 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Netherlands 1 2%
Unknown 48 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 33%
Student > Bachelor 9 18%
Student > Master 8 16%
Researcher 4 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 4%
Other 4 8%
Unknown 6 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Engineering 21 43%
Chemistry 8 16%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 6%
Chemical Engineering 2 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 4%
Other 7 14%
Unknown 6 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 July 2016.
All research outputs
#6,830,599
of 12,347,162 outputs
Outputs from Lab on a Chip - Miniaturisation for Chemistry & Biology
#2,450
of 3,838 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#114,694
of 268,205 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Lab on a Chip - Miniaturisation for Chemistry & Biology
#27
of 64 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,347,162 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,838 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.5. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,205 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 64 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its contemporaries.