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Involvement of spinal sensory pathway in ALS and specificity of cord atrophy to lower motor neuron degeneration

Overview of attention for article published in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Frontotemporal Degeneration, August 2012
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (57th percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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71 Dimensions

Readers on

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62 Mendeley
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Title
Involvement of spinal sensory pathway in ALS and specificity of cord atrophy to lower motor neuron degeneration
Published in
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Frontotemporal Degeneration, August 2012
DOI 10.3109/17482968.2012.701308
Pubmed ID
Authors

Julien Cohen-Adad, Mohamed-Mounir El Mendili, Régine Morizot-Koutlidis, Stéphane Lehéricy, Vincent Meininger, Sophie Blancho, Serge Rossignol, Habib Benali, Pierre-François Pradat

Abstract

Our objective was to demonstrate that ALS patients have sensory pathway involvement and that local cord atrophy reflects segmental lower motor neuron involvement. Twenty-nine ALS patients with spinal onset and twenty-one healthy controls were recruited. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), magnetization transfer and atrophy index were measured in the spinal cord, complemented with transcranial magnetic stimulations. Metrics were quantified within the lateral corticospinal and the dorsal segments of the cervical cord. Significant differences were detected between patients and controls for DTI and magnetization transfer metrics in the lateral and dorsal segments of the spinal cord. Fractional anisotropy correlated with ALSFRS-R (p = 0.04) and motor threshold (p = 0.02). Stepwise linear regression detected local spinal cord atrophy associated with weakness in the corresponding muscle territory, i.e. C4 level for deltoid and C7 level for hand muscles. In conclusion, impairment of spinal sensory pathways was detected at an early stage of the disease. Our data also demonstrate an association between muscle deficits and local spinal cord atrophy, suggesting that atrophy is a sensitive biomarker for lower motor neurons degeneration.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 62 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 3%
Unknown 60 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 29%
Researcher 9 15%
Student > Bachelor 6 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 10%
Student > Master 5 8%
Other 11 18%
Unknown 7 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 25 40%
Neuroscience 12 19%
Engineering 7 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 10%
Computer Science 1 2%
Other 1 2%
Unknown 10 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 September 2012.
All research outputs
#6,409,903
of 12,460,262 outputs
Outputs from Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Frontotemporal Degeneration
#262
of 374 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#53,058
of 125,211 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Frontotemporal Degeneration
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,460,262 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 374 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.8. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 125,211 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them