↓ Skip to main content

Central poststroke pain: somatosensory abnormalities and the presence of associated myofascial pain syndrome

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Neurology, September 2012
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (73rd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
22 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
78 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Central poststroke pain: somatosensory abnormalities and the presence of associated myofascial pain syndrome
Published in
BMC Neurology, September 2012
DOI 10.1186/1471-2377-12-89
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rogério Adas Ayres de Oliveira, Daniel Ciampi de Andrade, André Guelman Gomes Machado, Manoel Jacobsen Teixeira

Abstract

Central post-stroke pain (CPSP) is a neuropathic pain syndrome associated with somatosensory abnormalities due to central nervous system lesion following a cerebrovascular insult. Post-stroke pain (PSP) refers to a broader range of clinical conditions leading to pain after stroke, but not restricted to CPSP, including other types of pain such as myofascial pain syndrome (MPS), painful shoulder, lumbar and dorsal pain, complex regional pain syndrome, and spasticity-related pain. Despite its recognition as part of the general PSP diagnostic possibilities, the prevalence of MPS has never been characterized in patients with CPSP patients. We performed a cross-sectional standardized clinical and radiological evaluation of patients with definite CPSP in order to assess the presence of other non-neuropathic pain syndromes, and in particular, the role of myofascial pain syndrome in these patients.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 78 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Argentina 1 1%
Canada 1 1%
Unknown 76 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 20 26%
Researcher 8 10%
Professor 6 8%
Professor > Associate Professor 6 8%
Student > Bachelor 6 8%
Other 24 31%
Unknown 8 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 38 49%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 9%
Neuroscience 6 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 6%
Psychology 2 3%
Other 9 12%
Unknown 11 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 September 2012.
All research outputs
#6,984,160
of 12,373,815 outputs
Outputs from BMC Neurology
#623
of 1,406 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#60,699
of 125,925 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Neurology
#7
of 26 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,373,815 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,406 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 125,925 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 26 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.