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D-PLACE: A Global Database of Cultural, Linguistic and Environmental Diversity

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS ONE, July 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
13 news outlets
blogs
4 blogs
twitter
132 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages
googleplus
4 Google+ users
reddit
2 Redditors

Citations

dimensions_citation
25 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
93 Mendeley
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Title
D-PLACE: A Global Database of Cultural, Linguistic and Environmental Diversity
Published in
PLoS ONE, July 2016
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0158391
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kathryn R. Kirby, Russell D. Gray, Simon J. Greenhill, Fiona M. Jordan, Stephanie Gomes-Ng, Hans-Jörg Bibiko, Damián E. Blasi, Carlos A. Botero, Claire Bowern, Carol R. Ember, Dan Leehr, Bobbi S. Low, Joe McCarter, William Divale, Michael C. Gavin

Abstract

From the foods we eat and the houses we construct, to our religious practices and political organization, to who we can marry and the types of games we teach our children, the diversity of cultural practices in the world is astounding. Yet, our ability to visualize and understand this diversity is limited by the ways it has been documented and shared: on a culture-by-culture basis, in locally-told stories or difficult-to-access repositories. In this paper we introduce D-PLACE, the Database of Places, Language, Culture, and Environment. This expandable and open-access database (accessible at https://d-place.org) brings together a dispersed corpus of information on the geography, language, culture, and environment of over 1400 human societies. We aim to enable researchers to investigate the extent to which patterns in cultural diversity are shaped by different forces, including shared history, demographics, migration/diffusion, cultural innovations, and environmental and ecological conditions. We detail how D-PLACE helps to overcome four common barriers to understanding these forces: i) location of relevant cultural data, (ii) linking data from distinct sources using diverse ethnonyms, (iii) variable time and place foci for data, and (iv) spatial and historical dependencies among cultural groups that present challenges for analysis. D-PLACE facilitates the visualisation of relationships among cultural groups and between people and their environments, with results downloadable as tables, on a map, or on a linguistic tree. We also describe how D-PLACE can be used for exploratory, predictive, and evolutionary analyses of cultural diversity by a range of users, from members of the worldwide public interested in contrasting their own cultural practices with those of other societies, to researchers using large-scale computational phylogenetic analyses to study cultural evolution. In summary, we hope that D-PLACE will enable new lines of investigation into the major drivers of cultural change and global patterns of cultural diversity.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 132 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 93 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Italy 1 1%
Brazil 1 1%
Luxembourg 1 1%
Canada 1 1%
New Zealand 1 1%
Unknown 88 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 27 29%
Researcher 26 28%
Student > Master 14 15%
Student > Bachelor 8 9%
Other 5 5%
Other 13 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 22 24%
Social Sciences 21 23%
Environmental Science 8 9%
Psychology 8 9%
Arts and Humanities 7 8%
Other 27 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 211. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 October 2018.
All research outputs
#56,267
of 12,817,668 outputs
Outputs from PLoS ONE
#1,245
of 139,049 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,503
of 258,451 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS ONE
#51
of 4,377 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,817,668 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 139,049 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 258,451 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4,377 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.