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Expectations and needs of patients with a chronic disease toward self-management and eHealth for self-management purposes

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, July 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
twitter
43 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
47 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
200 Mendeley
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Title
Expectations and needs of patients with a chronic disease toward self-management and eHealth for self-management purposes
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, July 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12913-016-1484-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Martine W. J. Huygens, Joan Vermeulen, Ilse C. S. Swinkels, Roland D. Friele, Onno C. P. van Schayck, Luc P. de Witte

Abstract

Self-management is considered as an essential component of chronic care by primary care professionals. eHealth is expected to play an important role in supporting patients in their self-management. For effective implementation of eHealth it is important to investigate patients' expectations and needs regarding self-management and eHealth. The objectives of this study are to investigate expectations and needs of people with a chronic condition regarding self-management and eHealth for self-management purposes, their willingness to use eHealth, and possible differences between patient groups regarding these topics. Five focus groups with people with diabetes (n = 14), COPD (n = 9), and a cardiovascular condition (n = 7) were conducted in this qualitative research. Separate focus groups were organized based on patients' chronic condition. The following themes were discussed: 1) the impact of the chronic disease on patients' daily life; 2) their opinions and needs regarding self-management; and 3) their expectations and needs regarding, and willingness to use, eHealth for self-management purposes. A conventional content analysis approach was used for coding. Patient groups seem to differ in expectations and needs regarding self-management and eHealth for self-management purposes. People with diabetes reported most needs and benefits regarding self-management and were most willing to use eHealth, followed by the COPD group. People with a cardiovascular condition mentioned having fewer needs for self-management support, because their disease had little impact on their life. In all patient groups it was reported that the patient, not the care professional, should choose whether or not to use eHealth. Moreover, participants reported that eHealth should not replace, but complement personal care. Many participants reported expecting feelings of anxiety by doing measurement themselves and uncertainty about follow-up of deviant data of measurements. In addition, many participants worried about the implementation of eHealth being a consequence of budget cuts in care. This study suggests that aspects of eHealth, and the way in which it should be implemented, should be tailored to the patient. Patients' expected benefits of using eHealth to support self-management and their perceived controllability over their disease seem to play an important role in patients' willingness to use eHealth for self-management purposes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 43 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 200 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Netherlands 1 <1%
Unknown 199 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 38 19%
Student > Master 35 18%
Student > Bachelor 28 14%
Researcher 17 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 15 8%
Other 37 19%
Unknown 30 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 50 25%
Nursing and Health Professions 36 18%
Computer Science 14 7%
Psychology 13 7%
Social Sciences 13 7%
Other 35 18%
Unknown 39 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 57. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 June 2019.
All research outputs
#415,956
of 16,251,718 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#68
of 5,619 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#10,986
of 263,044 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#1
of 22 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,251,718 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,619 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,044 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 22 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.