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Perception of peer physical examination in two Australian osteopathy programs

Overview of attention for article published in Chiropractic & Manual Therapies, July 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (58th percentile)

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

Citations

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1 Dimensions

Readers on

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15 Mendeley
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Title
Perception of peer physical examination in two Australian osteopathy programs
Published in
Chiropractic & Manual Therapies, July 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12998-016-0102-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Brett Vaughan, Sandra Grace

Abstract

Peer physical examination (PPE) is an efficient and practical educational approach whereby students can practise their examination skills on each other before commencing clinical practice with actual patients. Little is known about the use of PPE in osteopathy education. Students in Year 1 of the osteopathy programs at Victoria University (Melbourne, Australia) and Southern Cross University (Lismore, Australia) completed the Examining Fellow Students and the Peer Physical Examination questionnaires prior to, and at the completion of, their first 12-week teaching session. Descriptive statistics were generated for each questionnaire. The McNemar and sign tests were used to evaluate differences between each questionnaire administration. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the influence of demographics on responses to both questionnaires. Results showed that students in both programs were generally willing to examine non-sensitive areas both before and after the 12-week teaching session. Students' were less apprehensive about PPE at the end of the teaching session, and this was reinforced by results for previous exposure to PPE in other courses. Consistent with previous studies, unwillingness to participate in PPE was associated with being female, being born outside Australia, holding religious beliefs, and being older. This is the first study to explore students' perceptions of PPE in this cohort and provides a basis for further work, including evaluating longer term changes in student perception of PPE, and whether these perceptions extend to practising manual therapy techniques. This study demonstrates that perceptions about PPE reported in medicine and other disciplines, namely that unwillingness to participate in PPE is associated with being female, being born outside Australia, holding religious beliefs, and being older, also apply to osteopathy. These findings are significant for all manual therapy students who spend a substantial portion of their course developing skills in PPE and practising manual therapy techniques. They highlight the need for curriculum development that acknowledges the importance of good practice in PPE, including discussions about body image, feedback skills training for educators, and providing detailed information to students about what to expect in practical skills classes before they commence their course.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 15 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 15 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 4 27%
Student > Postgraduate 3 20%
Student > Master 2 13%
Researcher 2 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 7%
Other 3 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 5 33%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 20%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 20%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 7%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 7%
Other 2 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 July 2016.
All research outputs
#3,512,228
of 8,133,552 outputs
Outputs from Chiropractic & Manual Therapies
#196
of 265 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#103,979
of 259,255 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Chiropractic & Manual Therapies
#8
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,133,552 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 55th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 265 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.3. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 259,255 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 10 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 2 of them.