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Regulatory roles of the NMDA receptor GluN3A subunit in locomotion, pain perception and cognitive functions in adult mice

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Physiology, November 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (58th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (70th percentile)

Mentioned by

patent
1 patent

Citations

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22 Dimensions

Readers on

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64 Mendeley
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Title
Regulatory roles of the NMDA receptor GluN3A subunit in locomotion, pain perception and cognitive functions in adult mice
Published in
Journal of Physiology, November 2012
DOI 10.1113/jphysiol.2012.239251
Pubmed ID
Authors

Osama Mohamad, Mingke Song, Ling Wei, Shan Ping Yu

Abstract

Since the discovery of the glutamate NMDA receptor subunit 3A (GluN3A), the functional role of this unique inhibitory subunit has been largely obscure. GluN3A expression is high in the neonatal brain but declines to a low level in the adult brain; it is thus commonly believed that GluN3A does not have a major functional impact in adulthood. Using wild-type (WT) and GluN3A knockout (KO) mice, we show here that deletion of GluN3A affected multiple behavioural functions in adult animals. GluN3A KO mice showed impaired locomotor activity on a variety of motor function tests, and increased sensitivity to acute and sub-acute inflammatory pain. GluN3A KO mice also showed enhanced recognition and spatial learning and memory functions. Hippocampal slices from juvenile and adult GluN3A KO mice showed greater long-term potentiation (LTP) compared with WT slices. GluN3A deletion resulted in increased expression of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) in the forebrain, and the phosphorylated CaMKII level upon LTP induction was significantly higher in the GluN3A KO hippocampus compared with WT controls. CaMKII inhibition abrogated the enhanced LTP in GluN3A KO slices. These data reveal for the first time that the presence of GluN3A may have profound impacts on several functional/behavioural activities in adult animals, and could be a therapeutic target for neurological disorders associated with NMDA receptor functions.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 64 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Japan 1 2%
United Kingdom 1 2%
Spain 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Unknown 60 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 25%
Researcher 11 17%
Student > Master 6 9%
Student > Bachelor 5 8%
Student > Postgraduate 4 6%
Other 15 23%
Unknown 7 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 18 28%
Neuroscience 14 22%
Medicine and Dentistry 12 19%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 6%
Chemistry 2 3%
Other 3 5%
Unknown 11 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 November 2017.
All research outputs
#3,605,841
of 12,445,334 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Physiology
#1,981
of 6,528 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#35,933
of 127,210 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Physiology
#13
of 51 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,445,334 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,528 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.7. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 127,210 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 51 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.