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Improved malaria case management in formal private sector through public private partnership in Ethiopia: retrospective descriptive study

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, July 2016
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (70th percentile)

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters

Citations

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10 Dimensions

Readers on

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59 Mendeley
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Title
Improved malaria case management in formal private sector through public private partnership in Ethiopia: retrospective descriptive study
Published in
Malaria Journal, July 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12936-016-1402-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mesele D. Argaw, Asfawesen GY. Woldegiorgis, Derebe T. Abate, Mesfin E. Abebe

Abstract

Malaria is a major public health problem and still reported among the 10 top causes of morbidity and mortality in Ethiopia. More than one-third of the people sought treatment from the private health sector. Evaluating adherences of health care providers to standards are paramount importance to determine the quality and the effectiveness of service delivery. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the contribution of public private mix (PPM) approach in improving quality of malaria case management among formal private providers. A retrospective data analysis was conducted using 2959 facility-months data collected from 110 PPM for malaria care facilities located in Amhara, Dire Dawa, Hareri, Oromia, Southern Nation Nationalities and Peoples and Tigray regions. Data abstraction formats were used to collect and collate the data on quarterly bases. The data were manually cleaned and analysed using Microsoft Office Excel 2010. To claim statistical significance non-parametric McNemar test was done and decision accepted at P < 0.05. From April 2012-September 2015, a total of 873,707 malaria suspected patients were identified, of which one-fourth (25.6 %) were treated as malaria cases. Among malaria suspected cases the proportion of malaria investigation improved from recorded in first quarter 87.7-100.0 % in last quarter (X(2) = 66.84, P < 0.001). The majority (96.0 %) were parasitologically-confirmed cases either by using microscopy or rapid diagnostic tests. The overall slid positivity rate was 25.1 % of which half (50.7 %) were positive for Plasmodium falciparum and slightly lower than half (45.2 %) for Plasmodium vivax; the remaining 8790 (4.1 %) showed mixed infections of P. falciparum and P. vivax. Adherence to appropriate treatment using artemether-lumefantrine (AL) was improved from 47.8 % in the first quarter to 95.7 % in the last quarter (X(2) = 12.89, P < 0.001). Similarly, proper patient management using chloroquine (CQ) was improved from 44.1 % in the first quarter to 98.12 % in the last quarter (X(2) = 11.62, P < 0.001). This study documented the chronological changes of adherence of health care providers with the national recommended standards to treat malaria. The PPM for malaria care services significantly improved the malaria case management practice of health care providers at the formal private health facilities. Therefore, regional health bureaus and partners shall closely work to scale up the initiated PPM for malaria care service.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 59 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 59 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 14 24%
Researcher 10 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 10%
Other 5 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 7%
Other 11 19%
Unknown 9 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 17 29%
Social Sciences 9 15%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 10%
Business, Management and Accounting 5 8%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 3%
Other 11 19%
Unknown 9 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 June 2020.
All research outputs
#4,432,600
of 16,235,163 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#1,371
of 4,567 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#75,554
of 261,752 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,235,163 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 72nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,567 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 261,752 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them