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Designing and delivering facilitated storytelling interventions for chronic disease self-management: a scoping review

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, July 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
4 news outlets
twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
36 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
112 Mendeley
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Title
Designing and delivering facilitated storytelling interventions for chronic disease self-management: a scoping review
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, July 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12913-016-1474-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Enza Gucciardi, Nicole Jean-Pierre, Grace Karam, Souraya Sidani

Abstract

Little is known about how to develop and deliver storytelling as an intervention to support those managing chronic illnesses. This scoping review aims to describe the core elements of storytelling interventions in order to help facilitate its implementation. A scoping review was conducted in seven databases for articles published up to May 2014 to identify interventions that describe in detail how storytelling was used to support people in disease self-management interventions. Ten articles met all inclusion criteria. Core elements consistently observed across the storytelling interventions were: reflection and interactive meaning-making of experiences; principles of informality and spontaneity; non-directional and non-hierarchical facilitation; development of group norms and conduct to create a community among participants; and both an individual and collective role for participants. Differences were also observed across interventions, such as: the conceptual frameworks that directed the design of the intervention; the type and training of facilitators; intervention duration; and how session topics were selected and stories delivered. Furthermore, evaluation of the intervention and outcome assessment varied greatly across studies. The use of storytelling can be a novel intervention to enhance chronic disease self-management. The core elements identified in the review inform the development of the intervention to be more patient-centred by guiding participants to take ownership of and lead the intervention, which differs significantly from traditional support groups. Storytelling has the potential to provide patients with a more active role in their health care by identifying their specific needs as well as gaps in knowledge and skills, while allowing them to form strong bonds with peers who share similar disease-related experiences. However, measures of impact differed across interventions given the variation in chronic conditions. Our findings can guide future development and implementations of storytelling interventions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 112 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 <1%
Unknown 111 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 19 17%
Student > Bachelor 13 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 11 10%
Researcher 10 9%
Other 23 21%
Unknown 24 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 25 22%
Medicine and Dentistry 16 14%
Social Sciences 12 11%
Psychology 8 7%
Computer Science 4 4%
Other 20 18%
Unknown 27 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 43. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 February 2022.
All research outputs
#720,946
of 21,063,002 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#163
of 7,012 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#14,280
of 272,586 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#1
of 22 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,063,002 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,012 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 272,586 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 22 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.