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Behavioral Neurobiology of Chronic Pain

Overview of attention for book
Attention for Chapter 344: The Self-administration of Analgesic Drugs in Experimentally Induced Chronic Pain.
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Chapter title
The Self-administration of Analgesic Drugs in Experimentally Induced Chronic Pain.
Chapter number 344
Book title
Behavioral Neurobiology of Chronic Pain
Published in
Current topics in behavioral neurosciences, September 2014
DOI 10.1007/7854_2014_344
Pubmed ID
Book ISBNs
978-3-66-245093-2, 978-3-66-245094-9
Authors

Wade CL, Fairbanks CA, Carrie L. Wade, Carolyn A. Fairbanks

Editors

Bradley K. Taylor, David P. Finn

Abstract

Systemically and centrally delivered opioids have been comprehensively studied for their effects both in analgesic and addiction models for many decades, primarily in subjects with presumptive normal sensory thresholds. The introduction of disease-based models of persistent hypersensitivity enabled chronic evaluation of opioid analgesic pharmacology under the specific state of chronic pain. These studies have largely (but not uniformly) reported reduced opioid analgesic potency and efficacy under conditions of chronic pain. A comparatively limited set of studies has evaluated the impact of experimentally induced chronic pain on self-administration patterns of opioid and non-opioid analgesics. Similarly, these studies have primarily (but not exclusively) found that responding for opioids is reduced under conditions of chronic pain. Additionally, such experiments have also demonstrated that the condition of chronic pain evokes self-administration or conditioned place preference for non-opioid analgesics. The consensus is that the chronic pain alters responding for opioid and non-opioid analgesics in a manner seemingly related to their respective antiallodynic/antihyperalgesic properties under the specific state of chronic pain.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 11 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 11 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 4 36%
Student > Master 2 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 9%
Professor 1 9%
Student > Bachelor 1 9%
Other 1 9%
Unknown 1 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 45%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 18%
Neuroscience 1 9%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 9%
Unknown 2 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 September 2014.
All research outputs
#2,385,421
of 4,246,387 outputs
Outputs from Current topics in behavioral neurosciences
#63
of 114 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#61,523
of 111,408 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Current topics in behavioral neurosciences
#5
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,246,387 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 114 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.3. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 111,408 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 3 of them.