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The 11 April 2012 east Indian Ocean earthquake triggered large aftershocks worldwide

Overview of attention for article published in Nature, September 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
15 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
42 tweeters
facebook
10 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
125 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
171 Mendeley
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Title
The 11 April 2012 east Indian Ocean earthquake triggered large aftershocks worldwide
Published in
Nature, September 2012
DOI 10.1038/nature11504
Pubmed ID
Authors

Fred F. Pollitz, Ross S. Stein, Volkan Sevilgen, Roland Bürgmann

Abstract

Large earthquakes trigger very small earthquakes globally during passage of the seismic waves and during the following several hours to days, but so far remote aftershocks of moment magnitude M ≥ 5.5 have not been identified, with the lone exception of an M = 6.9 quake remotely triggered by the surface waves from an M = 6.6 quake 4,800 kilometres away. The 2012 east Indian Ocean earthquake that had a moment magnitude of 8.6 is the largest strike-slip event ever recorded. Here we show that the rate of occurrence of remote M ≥ 5.5 earthquakes (>1,500 kilometres from the epicentre) increased nearly fivefold for six days after the 2012 event, and extended in magnitude to M ≤ 7. These global aftershocks were located along the four lobes of Love-wave radiation; all struck where the dynamic shear strain is calculated to exceed 10(-7) for at least 100 seconds during dynamic-wave passage. The other M ≥ 8.5 mainshocks during the past decade are thrusts; after these events, the global rate of occurrence of remote M ≥ 5.5 events increased by about one-third the rate following the 2012 shock and lasted for only two days, a weaker but possibly real increase. We suggest that the unprecedented delayed triggering power of the 2012 earthquake may have arisen because of its strike-slip source geometry or because the event struck at a time of an unusually low global earthquake rate, perhaps increasing the number of nucleation sites that were very close to failure.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 42 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 171 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 2%
Italy 2 1%
United Kingdom 2 1%
India 1 <1%
Chile 1 <1%
Ireland 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 157 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 48 28%
Researcher 48 28%
Professor 12 7%
Professor > Associate Professor 12 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 5%
Other 30 18%
Unknown 12 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Earth and Planetary Sciences 128 75%
Engineering 6 4%
Physics and Astronomy 4 2%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 2%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 <1%
Other 3 2%
Unknown 26 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 180. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 March 2021.
All research outputs
#133,042
of 18,783,186 outputs
Outputs from Nature
#10,162
of 82,540 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#694
of 146,029 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature
#133
of 1,049 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,783,186 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 82,540 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 92.8. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 146,029 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1,049 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.