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Friendship networks and psychological well-being from late adolescence to young adulthood: a gender-specific structural equation modeling approach

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Psychology, July 2016
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (70th percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 policy source
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2 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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13 Dimensions

Readers on

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36 Mendeley
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Title
Friendship networks and psychological well-being from late adolescence to young adulthood: a gender-specific structural equation modeling approach
Published in
BMC Psychology, July 2016
DOI 10.1186/s40359-016-0143-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alexander Miething, Ylva B. Almquist, Viveca Östberg, Mikael Rostila, Christofer Edling, Jens Rydgren

Abstract

The importance of supportive social relationships for psychological well-being has been previously recognized, but the direction of associations between both dimensions and how they evolve when adolescents enter adulthood have scarcely been addressed. The present study aims to examine the gender-specific associations between self-reported friendship network quality and psychological well-being of young people during the transition from late adolescence to young adulthood by taking into account the direction of association. A random sample of Swedes born in 1990 were surveyed at age 19 and again at age 23 regarding their own health and their relationships with a maximum of five self-nominated friends. The response rate was 55.3 % at baseline and 43.7 % at follow-up, resulting in 772 cases eligible for analysis. Gender-specific structural equation modeling was conducted to explore the associations between network quality and well-being. The measurement part included a latent measure of well-being, whereas the structural part accounted for autocorrelation for network quality and for well-being over time and further examined the cross-lagged associations. The results show that network quality increased while well-being decreased from age 19 to age 23. Females reported worse well-being at both time points, whereas no gender differences were found for network quality. Network quality at age 19 predicted network quality at age 23, and well-being at age 19 predicted well-being at age 23. The results further show positive correlations between network quality and well-being for males and females alike. The strength of the correlations diminished over time but remained significant at age 23. Simultaneously testing social causation and social selection in a series of competing models indicates that while there were no cross-lagged associations among males, there was a weak reverse association between well-being at age 19 and network quality at age 23 among females. The study contributes to the understanding of the direction of associations between friendship networks and psychological well-being from late adolescence to young adulthood by showing that while these dimensions are closely intertwined among males and females alike, females' social relationships seem to be more vulnerable to changes in health status.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 36 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
India 1 3%
Unknown 35 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 19%
Researcher 5 14%
Student > Bachelor 3 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 6%
Other 7 19%
Unknown 5 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 16 44%
Social Sciences 5 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 14%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 3%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 3%
Other 2 6%
Unknown 6 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 October 2019.
All research outputs
#3,704,795
of 14,072,211 outputs
Outputs from BMC Psychology
#179
of 320 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#74,136
of 259,166 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Psychology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,072,211 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 72nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 320 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 21.0. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 259,166 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them