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Comparison of wastewater-associated contaminants in the bed sediment of Hempstead Bay, New York, before and after Hurricane Sandy

Overview of attention for article published in Marine Pollution Bulletin, June 2016
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Title
Comparison of wastewater-associated contaminants in the bed sediment of Hempstead Bay, New York, before and after Hurricane Sandy
Published in
Marine Pollution Bulletin, June 2016
DOI 10.1016/j.marpolbul.2016.03.044
Pubmed ID
Authors

Shawn C. Fisher, Patrick J. Phillips, Bruce J. Brownawell, James P. Browne

Abstract

Changes in bed sediment chemistry of Hempstead Bay (HB) have been evaluated in the wake of Hurricane Sandy, which resulted in the release of billions of liters of poorly-treated sewage into tributaries and channels throughout the bay. Surficial grab samples (top 5cm) collected before and (or) after Hurricane Sandy from sixteen sites in HB were analyzed for 74 wastewater tracers and steroid hormones, and total organic carbon. Data from pre- and post-storm comparisons of the most frequently detected wastewater tracers and ratios of steroid hormone and of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations indicate an increased sewage signal near outfalls and downstream of where raw sewage was discharged. Median concentration of wastewater tracers decreased after the storm at sites further from outfalls. Overall, changes in sediment quality probably resulted from a combination of additional sewage inputs, sediment redistribution, and stormwater runoff in the days to weeks following Hurricane Sandy.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 24 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 24 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 7 29%
Student > Bachelor 4 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 13%
Student > Master 3 13%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 8%
Other 2 8%
Unknown 3 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 9 38%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 17%
Arts and Humanities 1 4%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 4%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 1 4%
Other 2 8%
Unknown 6 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 July 2016.
All research outputs
#10,890,175
of 12,288,060 outputs
Outputs from Marine Pollution Bulletin
#2,924
of 4,156 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#221,120
of 266,334 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Marine Pollution Bulletin
#90
of 145 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,288,060 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,156 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.9. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,334 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 145 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.