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Deciduous trees are a large and overlooked sink for snowmelt water in the boreal forest

Overview of attention for article published in Scientific Reports, July 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
twitter
19 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
43 Mendeley
Title
Deciduous trees are a large and overlooked sink for snowmelt water in the boreal forest
Published in
Scientific Reports, July 2016
DOI 10.1038/srep29504
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jessica M. Young-Robertson, W. Robert Bolton, Uma S. Bhatt, Jordi Cristóbal, Richard Thoman

Abstract

The terrestrial water cycle contains large uncertainties that impact our understanding of water budgets and climate dynamics. Water storage is a key uncertainty in the boreal water budget, with tree water storage often ignored. The goal of this study is to quantify tree water content during the snowmelt and growing season periods for Alaskan and western Canadian boreal forests. Deciduous trees reached saturation between snowmelt and leaf-out, taking up 21-25% of the available snowmelt water, while coniferous trees removed <1%. We found that deciduous trees removed 17.8-20.9 billion m(3) of snowmelt water, which is equivalent to 8.7-10.2% of the Yukon River's annual discharge. Deciduous trees transpired 2-12% (0.4-2.2 billion m(3)) of the absorbed snowmelt water immediately after leaf-out, increasing favorable conditions for atmospheric convection, and an additional 10-30% (2.0-5.2 billion m(3)) between leaf-out and mid-summer. By 2100, boreal deciduous tree area is expected to increase by 1-15%, potentially resulting in an additional 0.3-3 billion m(3) of snowmelt water removed from the soil per year. This study is the first to show that deciduous tree water uptake of snowmelt water represents a large but overlooked aspect of the water balance in boreal watersheds.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 19 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 43 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Russia 1 2%
Nepal 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Canada 1 2%
Unknown 39 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 11 26%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 16%
Student > Bachelor 6 14%
Student > Master 5 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 12%
Other 9 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 18 42%
Unspecified 9 21%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 8 19%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 14%
Physics and Astronomy 2 5%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 39. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 May 2018.
All research outputs
#377,121
of 12,487,019 outputs
Outputs from Scientific Reports
#4,321
of 57,318 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#13,765
of 258,019 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scientific Reports
#206
of 2,516 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,487,019 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 57,318 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 258,019 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2,516 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.