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Oxidative Stress–Induced Protein Damage Inhibits DNA Repair and Determines Mutation Risk and Therapeutic Efficacy

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Cancer Research, July 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#11 of 1,798)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
13 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
58 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
66 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Oxidative Stress–Induced Protein Damage Inhibits DNA Repair and Determines Mutation Risk and Therapeutic Efficacy
Published in
Molecular Cancer Research, July 2016
DOI 10.1158/1541-7786.mcr-16-0053
Pubmed ID
Authors

Elizabeth McAdam, Reto Brem, Peter Karran

Abstract

The relationship between sun exposure and non-melanoma skin cancer risk is well established. Solar ultraviolet radiation (UV; wavelengths 280-400 nm) is firmly implicated in skin cancer development. Nucleotide excision repair (NER) protects against cancer by removing potentially mutagenic DNA lesions induced by UVB (280-320 nm). How the 20-fold more abundant UVA (320-400 mn) component of solar UV radiation increases skin cancer risk is not understood. Here it is demonstrated that the contribution of UVA to the effect of UV radiation on cultured human cells is largely independent of its ability to damage DNA. Instead, the effects of UVA reflect the induction of oxidative stress that causes extensive protein oxidation. Because NER proteins are among those damaged, UVA irradiation inhibits NER and increases the cells' susceptibility to mutation by UVB. NER inhibition is a common consequence of oxidative stress. Exposure to chemical oxidants, treatment with drugs that deplete cellular antioxidants, and interventions that interfere with glucose metabolism to disrupt the supply of cellular reducing power all inhibit NER. Tumor cells are often in a condition of oxidative stress and one effect of the NER inhibition that results from stress-induced protein oxidation is an increased sensitivity to the anticancer drug cisplatin. Since NER is both a defense against cancer and a significant determinant of cell survival after treatment with anticancer drugs, its attenuation by protein damage under conditions of oxidative stress has implications for both cancer risk and for the effectiveness of anticancer therapy.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 66 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 3%
Unknown 64 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 15 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 18%
Student > Master 8 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 8%
Student > Bachelor 5 8%
Other 8 12%
Unknown 13 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 18 27%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 5%
Chemistry 3 5%
Other 10 15%
Unknown 16 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 105. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 June 2022.
All research outputs
#302,336
of 21,415,362 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Cancer Research
#11
of 1,798 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#6,427
of 273,578 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Cancer Research
#1
of 20 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,415,362 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,798 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 273,578 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 20 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.