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A systematic review of controlled trials on visual stress using Intuitive Overlays or the Intuitive Colorimeter

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Optometry, October 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#30 of 199)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (76th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (83rd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
10 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
34 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
32 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
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Title
A systematic review of controlled trials on visual stress using Intuitive Overlays or the Intuitive Colorimeter
Published in
Journal of Optometry, October 2016
DOI 10.1016/j.optom.2016.04.002
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bruce J.W. Evans, Peter M. Allen

Abstract

Claims that coloured filters aid reading date back 200 years and remain controversial. Some claims, for example, that more than 10% of the general population and 50% of people with dyslexia would benefit from coloured filters lack sound evidence and face validity. Publications with such claims typically cite research using methods that have not been described in the scientific literature and lack a sound aetiological framework. Notwithstanding these criticisms, some researchers have used more rigorous selection criteria and methods of prescribing coloured filters that were developed at a UK Medical Research Council unit and which have been fully described in the scientific literature. We review this research and disconfirm many of the more extreme claims surrounding this topic. This literature indicates that a minority subset of dyslexics (circa 20%) may have a condition described as visual stress which most likely results from a hyperexcitability of the visual cortex. Visual stress is characterised by symptoms of visual perceptual distortions, headaches, and eyestrain when viewing repetitive patterns, including lines of text. This review indicates that visual stress is distinct from, although sometimes co-occurs with, dyslexia. Individually prescribed coloured filters have been shown to improve reading performance in people with visual stress, but are unlikely to influence the phonological and memory deficits associated with dyslexia and therefore are not a treatment for dyslexia. This review concludes that larger and rigorous randomised controlled trials of interventions for visual stress are required. Improvements in the diagnosis of the condition are also a priority.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 32 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 32 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 22%
Student > Bachelor 5 16%
Researcher 3 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 9%
Unspecified 2 6%
Other 6 19%
Unknown 6 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 7 22%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 16%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 13%
Unspecified 2 6%
Social Sciences 2 6%
Other 6 19%
Unknown 6 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 March 2021.
All research outputs
#4,509,333
of 22,880,691 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Optometry
#30
of 199 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#76,693
of 324,349 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Optometry
#1
of 6 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,880,691 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 80th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 199 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 324,349 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them