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Intersectionality on the go: The diffusion of Black feminist knowledge across disciplinary and geographical borders

Overview of attention for article published in British Journal of Sociology, January 2021
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (66th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
42 tweeters

Readers on

mendeley
19 Mendeley
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Title
Intersectionality on the go: The diffusion of Black feminist knowledge across disciplinary and geographical borders
Published in
British Journal of Sociology, January 2021
DOI 10.1111/1468-4446.12816
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anna Keuchenius, Liza Mügge

Abstract

Kimberlé Crenshaw coined the term "intersectionality" in 1989 as a critique of feminist and critical race scholarship's neglect of-respectively-race and gender. Since then, the concept has been interpreted and reinterpreted to appeal to new disciplinary, geographical, and sociocultural audiences, generating heated debates over its appropriation and continued political significance. Drawing on all 3,807 publications in Scopus that contain the word "intersectionality" in the title, abstract, or keywords, we map the spread of intersectionality in academia through its citations. Network analysis reveals the contours of its diffusion among the 6,098 scholars in our data set, while automated text analysis, manual coding, and the close reading of publications reveal how the application and interpretation of intersectional thinking has evolved over time and space. We find that the diffusion network exhibits communities that are not well demarcated by either discipline or geography. Communities form around one or a few highly referenced scholars who introduce intersectionality to new audiences while reinterpreting it in a way that speaks to their research interests. By examining the microscopic interactions of publications and citations, our complex systems approach is able to identify the macroscopic patterns of a controversial concept's diffusion.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 42 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 19 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 19 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 21%
Student > Bachelor 3 16%
Researcher 2 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 11%
Student > Master 2 11%
Other 3 16%
Unknown 3 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 12 63%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 11%
Computer Science 1 5%
Psychology 1 5%
Chemistry 1 5%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 2 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 27. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 May 2021.
All research outputs
#911,300
of 17,721,313 outputs
Outputs from British Journal of Sociology
#82
of 894 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#33,295
of 401,757 outputs
Outputs of similar age from British Journal of Sociology
#5
of 12 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,721,313 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 894 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 401,757 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 12 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.