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Predictors of red blood cell transfusion after cardiac surgery: a prospective cohort study

Overview of attention for article published in Revista da Escola de Enfermagem da USP, December 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (52nd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (64th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

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3 Dimensions

Readers on

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24 Mendeley
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Title
Predictors of red blood cell transfusion after cardiac surgery: a prospective cohort study
Published in
Revista da Escola de Enfermagem da USP, December 2015
DOI 10.1590/s0080-623420150000600006
Pubmed ID
Authors

Camila Takao Lopes, Evelise Helena Fadini Reis Brunori, Agueda Maria Ruiz Zimmer Cavalcante, Sue Ann Moorhead, Juliana de Lima Lopes, Alba Lucia Bottura Leite de Barros

Abstract

To identify predictors of red blood cell transfusion (RBCT) after cardiac surgery. A prospective cohort study performed with 323 adults after cardiac surgery, from April to December of 2013. A data collection instrument was constructed by the researchers containing factors associated with excessive bleeding after cardiac surgery, as found in the literature, for investigation in the immediate postoperative period. The relationship between risk factors and the outcome was assessed by univariate analysis and logistic regression. The factors associated with RBCT in the immediate postoperative period included lower height and weight, decreased platelet count, lower hemoglobin level, higher prevalence of platelet count <150x10 3/mm 3, lower volume of protamine, longer duration of anesthesia, higher prevalence of intraoperative RBCT, lower body temperature, higher heart rate and higher positive end-expiratory pressure. The independent predictor was weight <66.5Kg. Factors associated with RBCT in the immediate postoperative period of cardiac surgery were found. The independent predictor was weight.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 24 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 24 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 6 25%
Other 5 21%
Student > Postgraduate 4 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 13%
Student > Bachelor 2 8%
Other 2 8%
Unknown 2 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 42%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 29%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 4%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 4%
Other 2 8%
Unknown 2 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 December 2020.
All research outputs
#10,440,306
of 18,047,439 outputs
Outputs from Revista da Escola de Enfermagem da USP
#103
of 413 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#123,549
of 266,410 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Revista da Escola de Enfermagem da USP
#6
of 14 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,047,439 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 413 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,410 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 14 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.