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The genetic basis of mood and anxiety disorders – changing paradigms

Overview of attention for article published in Biology of Mood & Anxiety Disorders, October 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
1 tweeter
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
14 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
49 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
The genetic basis of mood and anxiety disorders – changing paradigms
Published in
Biology of Mood & Anxiety Disorders, October 2012
DOI 10.1186/2045-5380-2-17
Pubmed ID
Authors

Elisabeth B Binder

Abstract

Family, twin and epidemiologic studies all point to an important genetic contribution to the risk to develop mood and anxiety disorders. While some progress has been made in identifying relevant pathomechanisms for these disorders, candidate based strategies have often yielded controversial findings. Hopes were thus high when genome-wide genetic association studies became available and affordable and allowed a hypothesis-free approach to study genetic risk factors for these disorders. In an unprecendented scientific collaborative effort, large international consortia formed to allow the analysis of these genome-wide association datasets across thousands of cases and controls ([1] and see also http://www.broadinstitute.org/mpg/ricopili/). Now that large meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been published for bipolar disorder and major depression it has become clear that main effects of common variants are difficult to identify in these disorders, suggesting that additional approaches maybe needed to understand the genetic basis of these disorders [2,3].

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 49 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 4%
United Kingdom 1 2%
Sweden 1 2%
New Zealand 1 2%
Germany 1 2%
Unknown 43 88%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Postgraduate 11 22%
Researcher 10 20%
Student > Master 7 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 12%
Professor > Associate Professor 5 10%
Other 9 18%
Unknown 1 2%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 26 53%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 16%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 4%
Social Sciences 2 4%
Other 2 4%
Unknown 5 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 May 2013.
All research outputs
#1,990,498
of 15,140,002 outputs
Outputs from Biology of Mood & Anxiety Disorders
#19
of 67 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#17,373
of 135,752 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Biology of Mood & Anxiety Disorders
#2
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,140,002 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 86th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 67 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 135,752 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.