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Estrous cycle influences excitatory amino acid transport and visceral pain sensitivity in the rat: effects of early-life stress

Overview of attention for article published in Biology of Sex Differences, July 2016
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Citations

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Title
Estrous cycle influences excitatory amino acid transport and visceral pain sensitivity in the rat: effects of early-life stress
Published in
Biology of Sex Differences, July 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13293-016-0086-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rachel D. Moloney, Jahangir Sajjad, Tara Foley, Valeria D. Felice, Timothy G. Dinan, John F. Cryan, Siobhain M. O’Mahony

Abstract

Early-life stress (ELS) is a recognized risk factor for chronic pain disorders, and females appear to be more sensitive to the negative effects of stress. Moreover, estrous cycle-related fluctuations in estrogen levels have been linked with alternating pain sensitivity. Aberrant central circuitry involving both the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and the lumbosacral spinal cord has also been implicated in the modulation of visceral pain in clinical and preclinical studies. Here we further investigate changes in visceral pain sensitivity and central glutamatergic systems in rats with respect to estrous cycle and ELS. We investigated visceral sensitivity in adult female Sprague-Dawley rats, which had undergone maternal separation (MS) in early life or remained non-separated (NS), by performing colorectal distension (CRD). We also assessed excitatory amino acid uptake through excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) in the lumbosacral spinal cord and ACC. NS animals in proestrus and estrus exhibited reduced EAAT uptake and decreased threshold to CRD. Moreover, total pain behaviors were increased in these stages. MS rats exhibited lower pain thresholds and higher total pain behaviors to CRD across all stages of the estrous cycle. Interestingly, cortical EAAT function in MS rats was inhibited in the low estrogen state-an effect completely opposite to that seen in NS rats. This data confirms that estrous cycle and ELS are significant factors in visceral sensitivity and fluctuations in EAAT function may be a perpetuating factor mediating central sensitization.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 46 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
Unknown 45 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 9 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 17%
Student > Master 7 15%
Lecturer 3 7%
Unspecified 3 7%
Other 7 15%
Unknown 9 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 15%
Neuroscience 7 15%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 9%
Psychology 3 7%
Other 9 20%
Unknown 8 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 July 2016.
All research outputs
#4,277,742
of 8,088,508 outputs
Outputs from Biology of Sex Differences
#104
of 145 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#141,623
of 258,052 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Biology of Sex Differences
#5
of 7 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,088,508 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 145 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.8. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 258,052 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 7 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 2 of them.