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Global Assessment of Schistosomiasis Control Over the Past Century Shows Targeting the Snail Intermediate Host Works Best

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, July 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
16 news outlets
blogs
5 blogs
policy
1 policy source
twitter
61 tweeters
facebook
7 Facebook pages
googleplus
2 Google+ users

Citations

dimensions_citation
77 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
232 Mendeley
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Title
Global Assessment of Schistosomiasis Control Over the Past Century Shows Targeting the Snail Intermediate Host Works Best
Published in
PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, July 2016
DOI 10.1371/journal.pntd.0004794
Pubmed ID
Authors

Susanne H. Sokolow, Chelsea L. Wood, Isabel J. Jones, Scott J. Swartz, Melina Lopez, Michael H. Hsieh, Kevin D. Lafferty, Armand M. Kuris, Chloe Rickards, Giulio A. De Leo

Abstract

Despite control efforts, human schistosomiasis remains prevalent throughout Africa, Asia, and South America. The global schistosomiasis burden has changed little since the new anthelmintic drug, praziquantel, promised widespread control. We evaluated large-scale schistosomiasis control attempts over the past century and across the globe by identifying factors that predict control program success: snail control (e.g., molluscicides or biological control), mass drug administrations (MDA) with praziquantel, or a combined strategy using both. For data, we compiled historical information on control tactics and their quantitative outcomes for all 83 countries and territories in which: (i) schistosomiasis was allegedly endemic during the 20th century, and (ii) schistosomiasis remains endemic, or (iii) schistosomiasis has been "eliminated," or is "no longer endemic," or transmission has been interrupted. Widespread snail control reduced prevalence by 92 ± 5% (N = 19) vs. 37 ± 7% (N = 29) for programs using little or no snail control. In addition, ecological, economic, and political factors contributed to schistosomiasis elimination. For instance, snail control was most common and widespread in wealthier countries and when control began earlier in the 20th century. Snail control has been the most effective way to reduce schistosomiasis prevalence. Despite evidence that snail control leads to long-term disease reduction and elimination, most current schistosomiasis control efforts emphasize MDA using praziquantel over snail control. Combining drug-based control programs with affordable snail control seems the best strategy for eliminating schistosomiasis.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 61 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 232 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 <1%
Tanzania, United Republic of 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Unknown 229 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 43 19%
Student > Bachelor 42 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 37 16%
Researcher 31 13%
Student > Postgraduate 13 6%
Other 32 14%
Unknown 34 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 58 25%
Medicine and Dentistry 40 17%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 21 9%
Environmental Science 18 8%
Immunology and Microbiology 15 6%
Other 40 17%
Unknown 40 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 204. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 January 2020.
All research outputs
#85,681
of 15,540,657 outputs
Outputs from PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases
#54
of 6,807 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,809
of 266,274 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases
#2
of 195 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,540,657 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,807 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,274 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 195 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.