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A political economy analysis of human resources for health (HRH) in Africa

Overview of attention for article published in Human Resources for Health, July 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (81st percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
16 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
6 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
84 Mendeley
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Title
A political economy analysis of human resources for health (HRH) in Africa
Published in
Human Resources for Health, July 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12960-016-0137-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

John Vincent Fieno, Yoswa M. Dambisya, Gavin George, Kent Benson

Abstract

Despite a global recognition from all stakeholders of the gravity and urgency of health worker shortage in Africa, little progress has been achieved to improve health worker coverage in many of the African human resources for health (HRH) crisis countries. The problem consists in how policy is made, how leaders are accountable, how the World Health Organization (WHO) and foreign donors encourage (or distort) health policy, and how development objectives are prioritized in these countries. This paper uses political economy analysis, which stems from a recognition that the solution to the shortage of health workers across Africa involves more than a technical response. A number of institutional arrangements dampen investments in HRH, including a mismatch between officials' tenure in office and program results, the vertical nature of health programming, the modalities of Overseas Development Assistance (ODA) in health, the structures of the global health community, and the weak capacity in HRH units within Ministries of Health. A major change in policymaking would only occur with a disruption to the political or institutional order. The case study of Ethiopia, who has increased its health workforce dramatically over the last 20 years, disrupted previous institutional arrangements through the power of ideas-HRH as a key intermediate development objective. The framing of HRH created the rationale for the political commitment to HRH investment. Ethiopia demonstrates that political will coupled with strong state capacity and adequate resource mobilization can overcome the institutional hurdles above. Donors will follow the lead of a country with long-term political commitment to HRH, as they did in Ethiopia.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 16 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 84 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 1%
Brazil 1 1%
Unknown 82 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 18 21%
Researcher 12 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 12%
Student > Bachelor 8 10%
Student > Postgraduate 6 7%
Other 23 27%
Unknown 7 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 24 29%
Social Sciences 14 17%
Nursing and Health Professions 11 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 7%
Business, Management and Accounting 4 5%
Other 14 17%
Unknown 11 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 14. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 February 2020.
All research outputs
#1,280,855
of 14,775,904 outputs
Outputs from Human Resources for Health
#149
of 826 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#31,277
of 262,485 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Human Resources for Health
#3
of 16 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,775,904 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 826 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.8. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 262,485 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 16 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.