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Patterns and prognostic relevance of PD-1 and PD-L1 expression in colorectal carcinoma

Overview of attention for article published in Modern Pathology, July 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (89th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (79th percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 news outlet
twitter
11 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

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59 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
79 Mendeley
Title
Patterns and prognostic relevance of PD-1 and PD-L1 expression in colorectal carcinoma
Published in
Modern Pathology, July 2016
DOI 10.1038/modpathol.2016.139
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lik Hang Lee, Marcela S Cavalcanti, Neil H Segal, Jaclyn F Hechtman, Martin R Weiser, J Joshua Smith, Julio Garcia-Aguilar, Eran Sadot, Peter Ntiamoah, Arnold J Markowitz, Moshe Shike, Zsofia K Stadler, Efsevia Vakiani, David S Klimstra, Jinru Shia

Abstract

Immune checkpoint blockade targeting the programmed death-1 (PD-1) pathway has shown efficacy in several types of cancers including mismatch-repair-deficient colorectal carcinoma. In some tumor types, programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) expression detected by immunohistochemistry has shown utility as a predictive marker for response to anti-PD-1 therapies. This utility, however, remains to be determined in colorectal carcinoma. In addition, although tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes have been associated with better prognosis in colorectal carcinoma, the prognostic value of PD-1 expression in these lymphocytes and its interaction with PD-L1 expression still await investigation. To address these questions, we performed a pilot study to evaluate the patterns of PD-L1 and PD-1 immunohistochemical expression on colorectal carcinoma cells and their tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, respectively. Using tissue microarray, we found that 5% (19/394) of colorectal carcinomas exhibited high tumor PD-L1 expression, and 19% (76/392) had elevated numbers of PD-1-positive tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes. PD-L1 levels correlated with PD-1 levels (P<0.001), and mismatch-repair-deficient tumors had significantly higher rates of high PD-L1 and PD-1 expression when compared with mismatch-repair-proficient tumors (18% vs 2% and 50% vs 13%, respectively; P<0.001 for both). Staining intensity was also stronger for both markers in mismatch-repair-deficient tumors. Furthermore, we observed that among patients with mismatch-repair-deficient colorectal carcinoma, PD-1/PD-L1 expression stratified recurrence-free survival in an inter-dependent manner: an association between high PD-1-positive tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes and improved recurrence-free survival (P=0.041) was maintained only when the tumors had low-level PD-L1 expression (P=0.006); patients whose tumors had both high PD-1-positive tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes and high PD-L1 expression had a significantly worse recurrence-free survival (P<0.001). Thus, our results not only provide a foundation for further assessment of PD-L1 immunohistochemistry as a predictive marker for anti-PD-1 therapy in colorectal carcinoma, they also shed light on the prognostic impact of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes in different subsets of mismatch-repair-deficient colorectal carcinomas.Modern Pathology advance online publication, 22 July 2016; doi:10.1038/modpathol.2016.139.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 11 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 79 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 2 3%
Unknown 77 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 12 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 14%
Student > Master 10 13%
Researcher 9 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 10%
Other 29 37%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 42 53%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 12 15%
Unspecified 11 14%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 9%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 3%
Other 5 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 16. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 April 2017.
All research outputs
#1,019,119
of 13,725,439 outputs
Outputs from Modern Pathology
#251
of 2,136 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#27,981
of 262,731 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Modern Pathology
#9
of 43 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,725,439 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,136 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 262,731 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 43 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.