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Response of Biological Soil Crust Diazotrophs to Season, Altered Summer Precipitation, and Year-Round Increased Temperature in an Arid Grassland of the Colorado Plateau, USA

Overview of attention for article published in Frontiers in Microbiology, January 2012
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Title
Response of Biological Soil Crust Diazotrophs to Season, Altered Summer Precipitation, and Year-Round Increased Temperature in an Arid Grassland of the Colorado Plateau, USA
Published in
Frontiers in Microbiology, January 2012
DOI 10.3389/fmicb.2012.00358
Pubmed ID
Authors

Chris M. Yeager, Cheryl R. Kuske, Travis D. Carney, Shannon L. Johnson, Lawrence O. Ticknor, Jayne Belnap

Abstract

Biological soil crusts (biocrusts), which supply significant amounts of fixed nitrogen into terrestrial ecosystems worldwide (∼33 Tg y(-1)), are likely to respond to changes in temperature and precipitation associated with climate change. Using nifH gene-based surveys, we explored variation in the diazotrophic community of biocrusts of the Colorado Plateau, USA in response to season (autumn vs. spring), as well as field manipulations that increased the frequency of small volume precipitation events and year-round soil temperature. Abundance of nifH genes in biocrusts ranged from 3 × 10(6) to 1 × 10(8) g(-1) soil, and nifH from heterocystous cyanobacteria closely related to Scytonema hyalinum, Spirirestis rafaelensis, and Nostoc commune comprised >98% of the total. Although there was no apparent seasonal effect on total nifH gene abundance in the biocrusts, T-RFLP analysis revealed a strong seasonal pattern in nifH composition. SpirirestisnifH abundance was estimated to oscillate 1 to >2 orders of magnitude between autumn (low) and spring (high). A year-round increase of soil temperature (2-3°C) had little effect on the diazotroph community structure over 2 years. Altered summer precipitation had little impact on diazotroph community structure over the first 1.5 years of the study, when natural background patterns across years and seasons superseded any treatment effects. However, after the second summer of treatments, nifH abundance was 2.6-fold lower in biocrusts receiving altered precipitation. Heterocystous cyanobacteria were apparently more resilient to altered precipitation than other cyanobacteria. The results demonstrate that diazotrophic community composition of biocrusts in this semi-arid grassland undergoes strong seasonal shifts and that the abundance of its dominant members decreased in response to more frequent, small volume precipitation events.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 58 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 5%
China 1 2%
Canada 1 2%
New Zealand 1 2%
Unknown 52 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 22%
Researcher 13 22%
Student > Master 12 21%
Professor 5 9%
Student > Bachelor 4 7%
Other 11 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 31 53%
Environmental Science 9 16%
Unspecified 5 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 9%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 3%
Other 6 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 September 2015.
All research outputs
#9,605,172
of 12,506,736 outputs
Outputs from Frontiers in Microbiology
#6,248
of 9,385 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#85,870
of 128,707 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Frontiers in Microbiology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,506,736 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,385 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.2. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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