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TEK and biodiversity management in agroforestry systems of different socio-ecological contexts of the Tehuacán Valley

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, July 2016
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (70th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (75th percentile)

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters

Citations

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10 Dimensions

Readers on

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62 Mendeley
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Title
TEK and biodiversity management in agroforestry systems of different socio-ecological contexts of the Tehuacán Valley
Published in
Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, July 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13002-016-0102-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mariana Vallejo-Ramos, Ana I. Moreno-Calles, Alejandro Casas

Abstract

Transformation of natural ecosystems into intensive agriculture is a main factor causing biodiversity loss worldwide. Agroforestry systems (AFS) may maintain biodiversity, ecosystem benefits and human wellbeing, they have therefore high potential for concealing production and conservation. However, promotion of intensive agriculture and disparagement of TEK endanger their permanence. A high diversity of AFS still exist in the world and their potentialities vary with the socio-ecological contexts. We analysed AFS in tropical, temperate, and arid environments, of the Tehuacan Valley, Mexico, to investigate how their capacity varies to conserve biodiversity and role of TEK influencing differences in those contexts. We hypothesized that biodiversity in AFS is related to that of forests types associated and the vigour of TEK and management. We conducted studies in a matrix of environments and human cultures in the Tehuacán Valley. In addition, we reviewed, systematized and compared information from other regions of Mexico and the world with comparable socio-ecological contexts in order to explore possible general patterns. Our study found from 26 % to nearly 90 % of wild plants species richness conserved in AFS, the decreasing proportion mainly associated to pressures for intensifying agricultural production and abandoning traditional techniques. Native species richness preserved in AFS is influenced by richness existing in the associated forests, but the main driver is how people preserve benefits of components and functions of ecosystems. Elements of modern agricultural production may coexist with traditional management patterns, but imposition of modern models may break possible balances. TEK influences decisions on what and how modern techniques may be advantageous for preserving biodiversity, ecosystem integrity in AFS and people's wellbeing. TEK, agroecology and other sciences may interact for maintaining and improving traditional AFS to increase biodiversity and ecosystem integrity while improving quality of life of people managing the AFS.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 62 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Ghana 1 2%
Unknown 61 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 14 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 13%
Researcher 7 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 10%
Student > Bachelor 6 10%
Other 14 23%
Unknown 7 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 23 37%
Environmental Science 15 24%
Social Sciences 3 5%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 3%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 2 3%
Other 8 13%
Unknown 9 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 March 2017.
All research outputs
#4,004,089
of 14,559,403 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine
#193
of 612 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#77,986
of 263,869 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine
#1
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,559,403 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 72nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 612 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,869 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them