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Disease introduction is associated with a phase transition in bighorn sheep demographics

Overview of attention for article published in Ecology, July 2016
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (70th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
5 tweeters

Citations

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13 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
62 Mendeley
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Title
Disease introduction is associated with a phase transition in bighorn sheep demographics
Published in
Ecology, July 2016
DOI 10.1002/ecy.1520
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kezia Manlove, E. Frances Cassirer, Paul Chafee Cross, Raina K. Plowright, Peter J. Hudson, Manlove, Kezia, Cassirer, E. Frances, Cross, Paul Chafee, Plowright, Raina K., Hudson, Peter J., Cross, Paul C., Paul C. Cross, Cassirer, E Frances, Cross, Paul C, Plowright, Raina K, Hudson, Peter J

Abstract

Ecological theory suggests that pathogens are capable of regulating or limiting host population dynamics, and this relationship has been empirically established in several settings. However, although studies of childhood diseases were integral to the development of disease ecology, few studies show population limitation by a disease affecting juveniles. Here, we present empirical evidence that disease in lambs constrains population growth in bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) based on 45 years of population-level and 18 years of individual-level monitoring across 12 populations. While populations generally increased (λ = 1.11) prior to disease introduction, most of these same populations experienced an abrupt change in trajectory at the time of disease invasion, usually followed by stagnant-to-declining growth rates (λ = 0.98) over the next 20 years. Disease-induced juvenile mortality imposed strong constraints on population growth that were not observed prior to disease introduction, even as adult survival returned to pre-invasion levels. Simulations suggested that models including persistent disease-induced mortality in juveniles qualitatively matched observed population trajectories, whereas models that only incorporated all-age disease events did not. We use these results to argue that pathogen persistence may pose a lasting, but under-recognized, threat to host populations, particularly in cases where clinical disease manifests primarily in juveniles.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 62 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Belgium 1 2%
Brazil 1 2%
Unknown 60 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 21 34%
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 27%
Student > Master 9 15%
Other 4 6%
Student > Postgraduate 3 5%
Other 6 10%
Unknown 2 3%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 36 58%
Environmental Science 8 13%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 4 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 5%
Mathematics 2 3%
Other 2 3%
Unknown 7 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 September 2016.
All research outputs
#3,866,486
of 14,145,010 outputs
Outputs from Ecology
#2,018
of 5,131 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#77,974
of 263,901 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Ecology
#53
of 105 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,145,010 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 72nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,131 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,901 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 105 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.