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Muscle injuries and strategies for improving their repair

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Experimental Orthopaedics, July 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
19 tweeters
facebook
5 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
30 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
125 Mendeley
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Title
Muscle injuries and strategies for improving their repair
Published in
Journal of Experimental Orthopaedics, July 2016
DOI 10.1186/s40634-016-0051-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Thomas Laumonier, Jacques Menetrey

Abstract

Satellite cells are tissue resident muscle stem cells required for postnatal skeletal muscle growth and repair through replacement of damaged myofibers. Muscle regeneration is coordinated through different mechanisms, which imply cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions as well as extracellular secreted factors. Cellular dynamics during muscle regeneration are highly complex. Immune, fibrotic, vascular and myogenic cells appear with distinct temporal and spatial kinetics after muscle injury. Three main phases have been identified in the process of muscle regeneration; a destruction phase with the initial inflammatory response, a regeneration phase with activation and proliferation of satellite cells and a remodeling phase with maturation of the regenerated myofibers. Whereas relatively minor muscle injuries, such as strains, heal spontaneously, severe muscle injuries form fibrotic tissue that impairs muscle function and lead to muscle contracture and chronic pain. Current therapeutic approaches have limited effectiveness and optimal strategies for such lesions are not known yet. Various strategies, including growth factors injections, transplantation of muscle stem cells in combination or not with biological scaffolds, anti-fibrotic therapies and mechanical stimulation, may become therapeutic alternatives to improve functional muscle recovery.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 19 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 125 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Unknown 123 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 31 25%
Student > Bachelor 26 21%
Student > Master 19 15%
Researcher 12 10%
Other 10 8%
Other 19 15%
Unknown 8 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 31 25%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 26 21%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 18 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 14 11%
Engineering 6 5%
Other 16 13%
Unknown 14 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 22. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 June 2018.
All research outputs
#701,269
of 13,079,903 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Experimental Orthopaedics
#2
of 75 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#21,727
of 263,395 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Experimental Orthopaedics
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,079,903 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 75 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,395 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them