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Total dosage of gardenia fruit used by patients with mesenteric phlebosclerosis

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, July 2016
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Title
Total dosage of gardenia fruit used by patients with mesenteric phlebosclerosis
Published in
BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, July 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12906-016-1182-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yutaka Nagata, Tetsuo Watanabe, Kazuhiko Nagasaka, Masaaki Yamada, Masafumi Murai, Sunao Takeuchi, Mai Murase, Toshinori Yazaki, Takayuki Murase, Kenichi Komatsu, Machiko Kaizuka, Mika Sano, Koji Asano, Chikao Ando, Norihide Taniuchi

Abstract

Mesenteric phlebosclerosis (MP) is a disease characterized by fibrotic change or calcification of the mesenteric vein. Recently, there has been an increase in case reports of MP related to herbal medicine usage. Long-term intake of gardenia fruit (GF) is suspected as a possible cause. However, many GF users do not develop this disease and the association between GF and MP remains unclear. In this study, we investigated for the first time the dosage of GF used by patients with and without MP. We used a medical chart review study design to assess the association between GF and MP. We reviewed patients with a history of intake of herbal medicines containing GF. Among these patients, we selected patients who were examined by colonoscopy and abdominal plain computed tomography (CT). We investigated the findings of colonoscopy, CT scan and histological examination. We assessed the total dosages of GF alongside the duration of ambulatory visit, the administration period of herbal medicine containing GF and pre-existing disease in order to compare MP cases and non-MP patients. Ten MP cases and 42 non-MP patients were analyzed. We summarized clinical findings of MP cases. All MP cases used more GF than non-MP patients and were administered more than approximately 5,000 grams of GF in cumulative dosage. This study indicated that excessive intake of GF contributes to and/or accelerates the development of MP suggesting that long-term usage of GF in excessive amounts increases the risk of MP.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 11 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 11 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Professor > Associate Professor 2 18%
Researcher 2 18%
Unspecified 1 9%
Student > Master 1 9%
Unknown 5 45%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 4 36%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 9%
Unspecified 1 9%
Unknown 5 45%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 July 2016.
All research outputs
#7,938,574
of 9,157,046 outputs
Outputs from BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine
#1,870
of 2,257 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#220,219
of 264,108 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine
#61
of 94 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,157,046 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,257 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.7. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 94 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.