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Human commensals producing a novel antibiotic impair pathogen colonization

Overview of attention for article published in Nature, July 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Citations

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274 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
951 Mendeley
citeulike
4 CiteULike
Title
Human commensals producing a novel antibiotic impair pathogen colonization
Published in
Nature, July 2016
DOI 10.1038/nature18634
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alexander Zipperer, Martin C. Konnerth, Claudia Laux, Anne Berscheid, Daniela Janek, Christopher Weidenmaier, Marc Burian, Nadine A. Schilling, Christoph Slavetinsky, Matthias Marschal, Matthias Willmann, Hubert Kalbacher, Birgit Schittek, Heike Brötz-Oesterhelt, Stephanie Grond, Andreas Peschel, Bernhard Krismer

Abstract

The vast majority of systemic bacterial infections are caused by facultative, often antibiotic-resistant, pathogens colonizing human body surfaces. Nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus predisposes to invasive infection, but the mechanisms that permit or interfere with pathogen colonization are largely unknown. Whereas soil microbes are known to compete by production of antibiotics, such processes have rarely been reported for human microbiota. We show that nasal Staphylococcus lugdunensis strains produce lugdunin, a novel thiazolidine-containing cyclic peptide antibiotic that prohibits colonization by S. aureus, and a rare example of a non-ribosomally synthesized bioactive compound from human-associated bacteria. Lugdunin is bactericidal against major pathogens, effective in animal models, and not prone to causing development of resistance in S. aureus. Notably, human nasal colonization by S. lugdunensis was associated with a significantly reduced S. aureus carriage rate, suggesting that lugdunin or lugdunin-producing commensal bacteria could be valuable for preventing staphylococcal infections. Moreover, human microbiota should be considered as a source for new antibiotics.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 781 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 951 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 8 <1%
Germany 5 <1%
United Kingdom 4 <1%
Spain 2 <1%
France 2 <1%
China 2 <1%
Denmark 2 <1%
Belgium 2 <1%
Indonesia 1 <1%
Other 11 1%
Unknown 912 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 205 22%
Researcher 173 18%
Student > Bachelor 169 18%
Student > Master 117 12%
Student > Postgraduate 45 5%
Other 171 18%
Unknown 71 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 261 27%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 195 21%
Immunology and Microbiology 111 12%
Chemistry 98 10%
Medicine and Dentistry 91 10%
Other 86 9%
Unknown 109 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2593. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 March 2020.
All research outputs
#569
of 14,571,953 outputs
Outputs from Nature
#97
of 72,681 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#15
of 264,249 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature
#3
of 962 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,571,953 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 72,681 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 80.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,249 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 962 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.