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Association Between Lifestyle Factors and the Incidence of Multimorbidity in an Older English Population

Overview of attention for article published in Journals of Gerontology Series A: Biological Sciences & Medical Sciences, July 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (87th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (81st percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 policy source
twitter
18 tweeters

Citations

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16 Dimensions

Readers on

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48 Mendeley
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Title
Association Between Lifestyle Factors and the Incidence of Multimorbidity in an Older English Population
Published in
Journals of Gerontology Series A: Biological Sciences & Medical Sciences, July 2016
DOI 10.1093/gerona/glw146
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nafeesa N. Dhalwani, Francesco Zaccardi, Gary O’Donovan, Patrice Carter, Mark Hamer, Thomas Yates, Melanie Davies, Kamlesh Khunti

Abstract

Evidence on the role of lifestyle factors in relation to multimorbidity, especially in elderly populations, is scarce. We assessed the association between five lifestyle factors and incident multimorbidity (presence of ≥2 chronic conditions) in an English cohort aged ≥50 years. We used data from waves 4, 5, and 6 of the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing. Data on smoking, alcohol consumption, physical activity, fruit and vegetable consumption, and body mass index were extracted and combined to generate a sum of unhealthy lifestyle factors for each individual. We examined whether these lifestyle factors individually or in combination predicted multimorbidity during the subsequent wave. We used marginal structural Cox proportional hazard models, adjusted for both time-constant and time-varying factors. A total of 5,476 participants contributed 232,749 person-months of follow-up during which 1,156 cases of incident multimorbidity were recorded. Physical inactivity increased the risk of multimorbidity by 33% (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR]: 1.33, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.03-1.73). The risk was about two to three times higher when inactivity was combined with obesity (aHR: 2.87, 95% CI: 1.55-5.31) or smoking (aHR: 2.35, 95% CI: 1.36-4.08) and about four times when combined with both (aHR: 3.98, 95% CI: 1.02-17.00). Any combination of 2, 3, and 4 or more unhealthy lifestyle factors significantly increased the multimorbidity hazard, compared with none, from 42% to 116%. This study provides evidence of a temporal association between combinations of different unhealthy lifestyle factors with multimorbidity. Population level interventions should include reinforcing positive lifestyle changes in the population to reduce the risk of developing multimorbidity.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 18 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 48 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 48 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 11 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 21%
Unspecified 8 17%
Researcher 8 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 6%
Other 8 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 19 40%
Unspecified 10 21%
Social Sciences 6 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 8%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 2 4%
Other 7 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 13. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 July 2019.
All research outputs
#1,273,434
of 13,713,171 outputs
Outputs from Journals of Gerontology Series A: Biological Sciences & Medical Sciences
#442
of 2,512 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#33,986
of 263,381 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journals of Gerontology Series A: Biological Sciences & Medical Sciences
#17
of 96 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,713,171 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,512 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,381 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 96 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.