↓ Skip to main content

Persistence of Pathogenic Prion Protein during Simulated Wastewater Treatment Processes

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Science & Technology, June 2008
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (89th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
6 tweeters
patent
2 patents
facebook
3 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
55 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
62 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Persistence of Pathogenic Prion Protein during Simulated Wastewater Treatment Processes
Published in
Environmental Science & Technology, June 2008
DOI 10.1021/es703186e
Pubmed ID
Authors

Glen T. Hinckley, Christopher J. Johnson, Kurt H. Jacobson, Christian Bartholomay, Katherine D. McMahon, Debbie McKenzie, Judd M. Aiken, Joel A. Pedersen

Abstract

Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs, prion diseases) are a class of fatal neurodegenerative diseases affecting a variety of mammalian species including humans. A misfolded form of the prion protein (PrP(TSE)) is the major, if not sole, component of the infectious agent. Prions are highly resistant to degradation and to many disinfection procedures suggesting that, if prions enter wastewater treatment systems through sewers and/or septic systems (e.g., from slaughterhouses, necropsy laboratories, rural meat processors, private game dressing) or through leachate from landfills that have received TSE-contaminated material, prions could survive conventional wastewater treatment. Here, we report the results of experiments examining the partitioning and persistence of PrPTSE during simulated wastewater treatment processes including activated and mesophilic anaerobic sludge digestion. Incubation with activated sludge did not result in significant PrPTSE degradation. PrPTSE and prion infectivity partitioned strongly to activated sludge solids and are expected to enter biosolids treatment processes. A large fraction of PrPTSE survived simulated mesophilic anaerobic sludge digestion. The small reduction in recoverable PrPTSE after 20-d anaerobic sludge digestion appeared attributable to a combination of declining extractability with time and microbial degradation. Our results suggest that if prions were to enter municipal wastewater treatment systems, most would partition to activated sludge solids, survive mesophilic anaerobic digestion, and be present in treated biosolids.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 62 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 3%
Unknown 60 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 17 27%
Student > Master 9 15%
Professor > Associate Professor 8 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 8%
Other 4 6%
Other 11 18%
Unknown 8 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 17 27%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 11%
Engineering 4 6%
Unspecified 3 5%
Other 11 18%
Unknown 13 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 15. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 August 2022.
All research outputs
#2,089,800
of 22,684,168 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Science & Technology
#2,536
of 18,642 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#5,669
of 81,829 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Science & Technology
#15
of 149 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,684,168 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 18,642 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 81,829 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 149 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.