↓ Skip to main content

Individualized Molecular Analyses Guide Efforts (IMAGE): A Prospective Study of Molecular Profiling of Tissue and Blood in Metastatic Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Cancer Research, August 2016
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (68th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (59th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
9 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
36 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
78 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Individualized Molecular Analyses Guide Efforts (IMAGE): A Prospective Study of Molecular Profiling of Tissue and Blood in Metastatic Triple-Negative Breast Cancer
Published in
Clinical Cancer Research, August 2016
DOI 10.1158/1078-0432.ccr-16-1543
Pubmed ID
Authors

Heather A. Parsons, Julia A. Beaver, Ashley Cimino-Mathews, Siraj M. Ali, Jennifer Axilbund, David Chu, Roisin M. Connolly, Rory L. Cochran, Sarah Croessmann, Travis A. Clark, Christopher D. Gocke, Stacie C. Jeter, Mark R. Kennedy, Josh Lauring, Justin Lee, Doron Lipson, Vincent A. Miller, Geoff A. Otto, Gary L. Rosner, Jeffrey S. Ross, Shannon Slater, Philip J. Stephens, Dustin A. VanDenBerg, Antonio C. Wolff, Lauren E. Young, Daniel J. Zabransky, Zhe Zhang, Jane Zorzi, Vered Stearns, Ben H. Park

Abstract

The clinical utility of next generation sequencing (NGS) in breast cancer has not been demonstrated.We hypothesized we could perform NGS of a new biopsy from patients with metastatic triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) in a clinically actionable timeframe. We planned to enroll 40 patients onto a prospective study, Individualized Molecular Analyses Guide Efforts (IMAGE),to evaluate the feasibility of obtaining a new biopsy of a metastatic site, perform NGS (FoundationOne{trade mark, serif}), and convene a molecular tumor board to formulate treatment recommendations within 28 days. We collected blood at baseline and at time of restaging to assess cell-free circulating plasma tumor DNA (ptDNA). We enrolled 26 women with metastatic TNBC who had received {greater than or equal to}1 line of prior chemotherapy, and 20 (77%) underwent NGS of a metastatic site biopsy.Twelve(60%) evaluable patients received treatment recommendations within 28 days of consent. The study closed after 20 patients underwent NGS, based on protocol-specified interim futility analysis.Three patients went on to receive genomically directed therapies. Twenty-four of 26 patients had genetic alterations successfully detected in ptDNA. Among 5 patients, 4 mutations found in tumor tissues were not identified in blood and 4 mutations found in blood were not found in corresponding tumors.In nine patients, NGS of follow up blood samples showed 100% concordance with baseline blood samples. This study demonstrates challenges of performing NGS on prospective tissue biopsies in patients with metastatic TNBC within 28 days, while also highlighting the potential use of blood as a more time efficient and less invasive method of mutational assessment.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 78 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 1%
Unknown 77 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 15 19%
Other 11 14%
Student > Master 10 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 9%
Other 13 17%
Unknown 15 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 21 27%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 16 21%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 14%
Computer Science 4 5%
Chemical Engineering 3 4%
Other 7 9%
Unknown 16 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 February 2021.
All research outputs
#5,490,712
of 18,750,173 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Cancer Research
#5,167
of 11,524 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#85,036
of 273,677 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Cancer Research
#74
of 186 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,750,173 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 70th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 11,524 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 273,677 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 186 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its contemporaries.