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Whose pain is it anyway? Comparability of pain reports from children and their parents

Overview of attention for article published in Chiropractic & Manual Therapies, August 2016
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (67th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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11 Dimensions

Readers on

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24 Mendeley
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Title
Whose pain is it anyway? Comparability of pain reports from children and their parents
Published in
Chiropractic & Manual Therapies, August 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12998-016-0104-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Steven J. Kamper, Kristina Boe Dissing, Lise Hestbaek

Abstract

There is a high demand for robust research into understanding the scope and consequences of musculoskeletal pain in children. An important part of this involves clarifying issues surrounding its measurement, not least differences in reporting from the children themselves and their parents. Therefore this study will assess the degree of agreement between parents' report of their child's pain and the child's own assessment. Data were collected in 2013 and 2014 as part of a larger cohort study investigating the health of Danish school children. Two study samples included 354 and 334 child-parent pairs who were independently asked whether the child had experienced musculoskeletal pain in the previous week. Children were between the ages of 10 and 14 years old. Parents provided answers via text message and children were questioned in person or via questionnaire at their school. Percentage agreement between parent and child assessment was around 50 % in Sample 1 and 68 % in Sample 2. The poor agreement was due to children reporting pain when their parent did not, the reverse very rarely occurred. Pain of greater intensity or longer duration resulted in better agreement between the child and parent. Child age and gender did not influence the likelihood of agreement. Children often experience pain that is not reported by their parents resulting in poor concordance between pain reports from the two sources. While it is not possible to say which is more valid we can conclude they are not interchangeable.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 24 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 4%
United States 1 4%
Australia 1 4%
Unknown 21 88%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 17%
Researcher 4 17%
Other 3 13%
Student > Bachelor 3 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 13%
Other 4 17%
Unknown 3 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 25%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 21%
Psychology 5 21%
Social Sciences 1 4%
Sports and Recreations 1 4%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 6 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 November 2017.
All research outputs
#3,354,635
of 12,151,889 outputs
Outputs from Chiropractic & Manual Therapies
#211
of 330 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#84,479
of 265,626 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Chiropractic & Manual Therapies
#6
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,151,889 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 71st percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 330 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.3. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,626 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 10 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 4 of them.