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Early identification of sepsis in hospital inpatients by ward nurses increases 30-day survival

Overview of attention for article published in Critical Care, August 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#17 of 5,362)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
12 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
321 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
35 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
190 Mendeley
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Title
Early identification of sepsis in hospital inpatients by ward nurses increases 30-day survival
Published in
Critical Care, August 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13054-016-1423-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Malvin Torsvik, Lise Tuset Gustad, Arne Mehl, Inger Lise Bangstad, Liv Jorun Vinje, Jan Kristian Damås, Erik Solligård

Abstract

Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and sepsis are now frequently identified by observations of vital signs and detection of organ failure during triage in the emergency room. However, there is less focus on the effect on patient outcome with better observation and treatment at the ward level. This was a before-and-after intervention study in one emergency and community hospital within the Mid-Norway Sepsis Study catchment area. All patients with confirmed bloodstream infection have been prospectively registered continuously since 1994. Severity of sepsis, observation frequency of vital signs, treatment data, length of stay (LOS) in high dependency and intensive care units, and mortality were retrospectively registered from the patients' medical journals. The post-intervention group (n = 409) were observed better and had higher odds of surviving 30 days (OR 2.7, 95 % CI 1.6, 4.6), lower probability of developing severe organ failure (0.7, 95 % CI 0.4, 0.9), and on average, 3.7 days (95 % CI 1.5, 5.9 days) shorter LOS than the pre-intervention group (n = 472). In a cohort with stable mortality rates, early sepsis recognition by ward nurses may have reduced progression of disease and improved survival for patients in hospital with sepsis.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 321 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 190 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 190 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 33 17%
Student > Master 27 14%
Researcher 20 11%
Student > Postgraduate 18 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 9%
Other 39 21%
Unknown 36 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 64 34%
Medicine and Dentistry 50 26%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 3%
Engineering 5 3%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 3%
Other 19 10%
Unknown 41 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 312. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 November 2019.
All research outputs
#59,178
of 17,641,103 outputs
Outputs from Critical Care
#17
of 5,362 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,750
of 271,962 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Critical Care
#1
of 51 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,641,103 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,362 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 271,962 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 51 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.