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A comparative assessment of SNP and microsatellite markers for assigning parentage in a socially monogamous bird

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Ecology Resources, August 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (86th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (78th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
19 tweeters

Citations

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37 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
153 Mendeley
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1 CiteULike
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Title
A comparative assessment of SNP and microsatellite markers for assigning parentage in a socially monogamous bird
Published in
Molecular Ecology Resources, August 2016
DOI 10.1111/1755-0998.12589
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sara A. Kaiser, Scott A. Taylor, Nancy Chen, T. Scott Sillett, Eliana R. Bondra, Michael S. Webster

Abstract

Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are preferred over microsatellite markers in many evolutionary studies, but have only recently been applied to studies of parentage. Evaluations of SNPs and microsatellites for assigning parentage have mostly focused on special cases that require a relatively large number of heterozygous loci, such as species with low genetic diversity or with complex social structures. We developed 120 SNP markers from a transcriptome assembled using RNA-sequencing of a songbird with the most common avian mating system - social monogamy. We compared the effectiveness of 97 novel SNPs and six previously described microsatellites for assigning paternity in the black-throated blue warbler, Setophaga caerulescens. We show that the full panel of 97 SNPs (mean HO = 0.19) was as powerful for assigning paternity as the panel of multiallelic microsatellites (mean HO = 0.86). Paternity assignments using the two marker types were in agreement for 92% of the offspring. Filtering individual samples by a 50% call rate and SNPs by a 75% call rate maximized the number of offspring assigned with 95% confidence using SNPs. We also found that the 40 most heterozygous SNPs (mean HO = 0.37) had similar power to assign paternity as the full panel of 97 SNPs. These findings demonstrate that a relatively small number of variable SNPs can be effective for parentage analyses in a socially monogamous species. We suggest that the development of SNP markers is advantageous for studies that require high-throughput genotyping or that plan to address a range of ecological and evolutionary questions. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 19 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 153 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 1%
Italy 1 <1%
Chile 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Unknown 147 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 43 28%
Researcher 30 20%
Student > Master 22 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 11 7%
Professor > Associate Professor 7 5%
Other 25 16%
Unknown 15 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 88 58%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 24 16%
Environmental Science 15 10%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 <1%
Arts and Humanities 1 <1%
Other 2 1%
Unknown 22 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 March 2018.
All research outputs
#1,160,949
of 12,639,455 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Ecology Resources
#185
of 897 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#34,367
of 262,448 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Ecology Resources
#8
of 37 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,639,455 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 897 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 262,448 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 37 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.