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A systematic review on the clustering and co-occurrence of multiple risk behaviours

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, July 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
7 news outlets
twitter
43 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
97 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
158 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
A systematic review on the clustering and co-occurrence of multiple risk behaviours
Published in
BMC Public Health, July 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12889-016-3373-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nick Meader, Kristelle King, Thirimon Moe-Byrne, Kath Wright, Hilary Graham, Mark Petticrew, Chris Power, Martin White, Amanda J. Sowden

Abstract

Risk behaviours, such as smoking and physical inactivity account for up to two-thirds of all cardiovascular deaths, and are associated with substantial increased mortality in many conditions including cancer and diabetes. As risk behaviours are thought to co-occur in individuals we conducted a systematic review of studies addressing clustering or co-occurrence of risk behaviours and their predictors. As the main aim of the review was to inform public health policy in England we limited inclusion to studies conducted in the UK. Key databases were searched from 1990 to 2016. We included UK based cross-sectional and longitudinal studies that investigated risk behaviours such as smoking, physical inactivity, unhealthy diet. High heterogeneity precluded meta-analyses. Thirty-seven studies were included in the review (32 cross-sectional and five longitudinal). Most studies investigated unhealthy diet, physical inactivity, alcohol misuse, and smoking. In general adult populations, there was relatively strong evidence of clustering between alcohol misuse and smoking; and unhealthy diet and smoking. For young adults, there was evidence of clustering between sexual risk behaviour and smoking, sexual risk behaviour and illicit drug use, and sexual risk behaviour and alcohol misuse. The strongest associations with co-occurrence and clustering of multiple risk behaviours were occupation (up to 4-fold increased odds in lower SES groups) and education (up to 5-fold increased odds in those with no qualifications). Among general adult populations, alcohol misuse and smoking was the most commonly identified risk behaviour cluster. Among young adults, there was consistent evidence of clustering found between sexual risk behaviour and substance misuse. Socio-economic status was the strongest predictor of engaging in multiple risk behaviours. This suggests the potential for interventions targeting multiple risk behaviours either sequentially or concurrently particularly where there is evidence of clustering. In addition, there is potential for intervening at the social or environmental level due to the strong association with socio-economic status.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 43 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 158 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 1%
Unknown 156 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 32 20%
Researcher 22 14%
Student > Master 19 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 13 8%
Student > Bachelor 11 7%
Other 33 21%
Unknown 28 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 44 28%
Psychology 21 13%
Social Sciences 19 12%
Nursing and Health Professions 10 6%
Sports and Recreations 4 3%
Other 14 9%
Unknown 46 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 84. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 March 2020.
All research outputs
#239,100
of 15,094,326 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#198
of 10,428 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#7,672
of 266,313 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#1
of 13 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,094,326 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 10,428 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,313 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 13 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.