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Increased water deficit decreases Douglas fir growth throughout western US forests

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, August 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (76th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
6 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
16 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
70 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
176 Mendeley
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Title
Increased water deficit decreases Douglas fir growth throughout western US forests
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, August 2016
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1602384113
Pubmed ID
Authors

Christina M. Restaino, David L. Peterson, Jeremy Littell

Abstract

Changes in tree growth rates can affect tree mortality and forest feedbacks to the global carbon cycle. As air temperature increases, evaporative demand also increases, increasing effective drought in forest ecosystems. Using a spatially comprehensive network of Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) chronologies from 122 locations that represent distinct climate environments in the western United States, we show that increased temperature decreases growth via vapor pressure deficit (VPD) across all latitudes. Using an ensemble of global circulation models, we project an increase in both the mean VPD associated with the lowest growth extremes and the probability of exceeding these VPD values. As temperature continues to increase in future decades, we can expect deficit-related stress to increase and consequently Douglas fir growth to decrease throughout its US range.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 16 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 176 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 2%
Spain 2 1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Unknown 169 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 47 27%
Student > Ph. D. Student 39 22%
Student > Master 21 12%
Student > Bachelor 11 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 11 6%
Other 23 13%
Unknown 24 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 58 33%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 40 23%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 25 14%
Engineering 5 3%
Computer Science 2 1%
Other 13 7%
Unknown 33 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 71. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 August 2016.
All research outputs
#326,455
of 16,219,091 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#6,804
of 86,876 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#9,224
of 267,900 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#209
of 901 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,219,091 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 86,876 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 29.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,900 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 901 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.