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Normal saline versus lower-chloride solutions for kidney transplantation

Overview of attention for article published in Cochrane database of systematic reviews, August 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (76th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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9 tweeters
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2 Facebook pages

Citations

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26 Dimensions

Readers on

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84 Mendeley
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Title
Normal saline versus lower-chloride solutions for kidney transplantation
Published in
Cochrane database of systematic reviews, August 2016
DOI 10.1002/14651858.cd010741.pub2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Susan Wan, Matthew A Roberts, Peter Mount

Abstract

The ideal intravenous fluid for kidney transplantation has not been defined, despite the common use of normal saline during the peri-operative period. The high chloride content of normal saline is associated with an increased risk of hyperchloraemic metabolic acidosis, which may in turn increase the risk of hyperkalaemia and delayed graft function. Balanced electrolyte solutions have a lower chloride content which may decrease this risk and avoid the need for dialysis due to hyperkalaemia in the immediate post-transplant period. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) addressing this issue have used biochemical outcomes to compare fluids and have been underpowered to address patient-centred outcomes such as delayed graft function. To examine the effect of lower-chloride solutions versus normal saline on delayed graft function, hyperkalaemia and acid-base status in kidney transplant recipients. We searched the Cochrane Kidney and Transplant's Specialised Register to 26 November 2015 through contact with the Information Specialist using search terms relevant to this review. RCTs of kidney transplant recipients that compared peri-operative intravenous lower-chloride solutions to normal saline were included. Two independent investigators assessed studies for eligibility and risk of bias. Data from individual studies were extracted using standardised forms and pooled according to a published protocol. Summary estimates of effect were obtained using a random-effects model, and results were expressed as risk ratios (RR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) for dichotomous outcomes, and mean difference (MD) and 95% CI for continuous outcomes. Six studies (477 participants) were included in the review. All participants were adult kidney transplant recipients and 70% of participants underwent live-donor kidney transplantation. The overall risk of bias was low for selection bias and unclear for remaining domains. There was no difference in the risk of delayed graft function (3 studies, 298 participants: RR 1.03, 95% CI 0.62 to 1.70) or hyperkalaemia (2 studies, 199 participants: RR 0.48, 95% CI 0.04 to 6.10) for participants who received balanced electrolyte solutions compared to normal saline. Intraoperative balanced electrolyte solutions compared to normal saline were associated with higher blood pH (3 studies, 193 participants: MD 0.07, 95% CI 0.05 to 0.09), higher serum bicarbonate (3 studies, 215 participants: MD 3.02 mEq/L, 95% CI 2.00 to 4.05) and lower serum chloride (3 studies, 215 participants: MD -9.93 mmol/L, 95% CI -19.96 to 0.11). There were four cases of graft loss in the normal saline group and one in the balanced electrolyte solution group, and four cases of acute rejection in the normal saline group compared to two cases in the balanced electrolyte solution group. Balanced electrolyte solutions are associated with less hyperchloraemic metabolic acidosis compared to normal saline, however it remains uncertain whether lower-chloride solutions lead to improved graft outcomes compared to normal saline.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 84 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 1%
Unknown 83 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 15 18%
Student > Master 14 17%
Other 13 15%
Researcher 10 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 8%
Other 13 15%
Unknown 12 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 49 58%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 8%
Social Sciences 2 2%
Computer Science 1 1%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 1%
Other 7 8%
Unknown 17 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 March 2018.
All research outputs
#2,736,100
of 14,499,191 outputs
Outputs from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#5,656
of 10,985 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#63,377
of 265,618 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#87
of 156 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,499,191 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 81st percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 10,985 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 22.0. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,618 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 156 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.