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A decade of intestinal protozoan epidemiology among settled immigrants in Qatar

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, August 2016
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Title
A decade of intestinal protozoan epidemiology among settled immigrants in Qatar
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, August 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12879-016-1728-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Marawan A. Abu-Madi, Jerzy M. Behnke, Sonia Boughattas, Asma Al-Thani, Sanjay H. Doiphode

Abstract

The World Health Organization estimates that about 3.5 billion people worldwide are affected by intestinal parasitic infections. Reports have already emphasized the role of immigrants in outbreaks of parasitic diseases in industrialized countries. With the mass influx of immigrants to Qatar, patent intestinal parasitic infections have been observed. Herein, the prevalence of intestinal protozoan infections was analysed in 29,286 records of subjects referred for stool examination at the Hamad Medical Corporation over the course of a decade (2005 to 2014, inclusive). Overall prevalence of combined protozoan infections was 5.93 % but there were significant temporal trends, age and sex effects and those arising from the region of origin of the subjects. The most common protozoan was Blastocystis hominis (overall prevalence 3.45 %). Giardia duodenalis, Chilomastix mesnili, Entamoeba coli, Entamoeba hartmanni, Endolimax nana, Iodamoeba butschlii, Entamoeba histolytica/dispar, Cryptosporidium sp. and a single case of Isospora were also detected. The prevalence of combined protozoan infections, G. duodenalis and the non-pathogenic amoebae all declined significantly across the decade. That of B. hominis varied between years but showed no directional trend across years and there was no evidence that prevalence of E. histolyitica/dispar changed significantly. Protozoan infections were observed among all regional groups, but prevalence was higher among subjects from the Arabian Peninsula, Africa and Asia compared to those from the Eastern Mediterranean and Qatar. Prevalence was higher among male subjects in all cases, but age-prevalence profiles differed between the taxa. These results offer optimism that prevalence will continue to decline in the years ahead.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 42 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 42 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 9 21%
Student > Bachelor 7 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 10%
Student > Postgraduate 2 5%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 5%
Other 6 14%
Unknown 12 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 21%
Chemistry 4 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 7%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 3 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 5%
Other 8 19%
Unknown 13 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 August 2016.
All research outputs
#7,089,963
of 8,192,854 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#3,329
of 3,674 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#217,403
of 257,284 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#137
of 167 outputs
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