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Using a gamified monitoring app to change adolescents’ snack intake: the development of the REWARD app and evaluation design

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, August 2016
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Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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18 Dimensions

Readers on

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295 Mendeley
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Title
Using a gamified monitoring app to change adolescents’ snack intake: the development of the REWARD app and evaluation design
Published in
BMC Public Health, August 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12889-016-3286-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

W. Van Lippevelde, J. Vangeel, N. De Cock, C. Lachat, L. Goossens, K. Beullens, L. Vervoort, C. Braet, L. Maes, S. Eggermont, B. Deforche, J. Van Camp

Abstract

As the snacking pattern of European adolescents is of great concern, effective interventions are necessary. Till now health promotion efforts in children and adolescents have had only limited success in changing adolescents' eating patterns and anthropometrics. Therefore, the present study proposes an innovative approach to influence dietary behaviors in youth based on new insights on effective behavior change strategies and attractive intervention channels to engage adolescents. This article describes the rationale, the development, and evaluation design of the 'Snack Track School' app. The aim of the app is to improve the snacking patterns of Flemish 14- to 16-year olds. The development of the app was informed by the systematic, stepwise, iterative, and collaborative principles of the Intervention Mapping protocol. A four week mHealth intervention was developed based on the dual-system model with behavioral change strategies targeting both the reflective (i.e., active learning, advance organizers, mere exposure, goal-setting, monitoring, and feedback) and automatic processes (i.e., rewards and positive reinforcement). This intervention will be evaluated via a controlled pre-post design in Flemish schools among 1400 adolescents. When this intervention including strategies focused on both the reflective and automatic pathway proves to be effective, it will offer a new scientifically-based vision, guidelines and practical tools for public health and health promotion (i.e., incorporation of learning theories in intervention programs). NCT02622165 registrated November 15, 2015 on clinicaltrials.gov.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 295 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 <1%
Unknown 294 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 46 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 43 15%
Student > Bachelor 35 12%
Researcher 25 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 24 8%
Other 49 17%
Unknown 73 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 45 15%
Psychology 36 12%
Medicine and Dentistry 29 10%
Social Sciences 22 7%
Computer Science 14 5%
Other 55 19%
Unknown 94 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 August 2017.
All research outputs
#13,986,547
of 22,882,389 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#10,098
of 14,924 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#210,247
of 366,891 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#256
of 374 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,882,389 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 14,924 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.9. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 366,891 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 374 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.