↓ Skip to main content

A Heparan-Dependent Herpesvirus Targets the Olfactory Neuroepithelium for Host Entry

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS Pathogens, November 2012
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (70th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

patent
1 patent
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
26 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
19 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
A Heparan-Dependent Herpesvirus Targets the Olfactory Neuroepithelium for Host Entry
Published in
PLoS Pathogens, November 2012
DOI 10.1371/journal.ppat.1002986
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ricardo Milho, Bruno Frederico, Stacey Efstathiou, Philip G. Stevenson

Abstract

Herpesviruses are ubiquitous pathogens that cause much disease. The difficulty of clearing their established infections makes host entry an important target for control. However, while herpesviruses have been studied extensively in vitro, how they cross differentiated mucus-covered epithelia in vivo is unclear. To establish general principles we tracked host entry by Murid Herpesvirus-4 (MuHV-4), a lymphotropic rhadinovirus related to the Kaposi's Sarcoma-associated Herpesvirus. Spontaneously acquired virions targeted the olfactory neuroepithelium. Like many herpesviruses, MuHV-4 binds to heparan sulfate (HS), and virions unable to bind HS showed poor host entry. While the respiratory epithelium expressed only basolateral HS and was bound poorly by incoming virions, the neuroepithelium also displayed HS on its apical neuronal cilia and was bound strongly. Incoming virions tracked down the neuronal cilia, and either infected neurons or reached the underlying microvilli of the adjacent glial (sustentacular) cells and infected them. Thus the olfactory neuroepithelium provides an important and complex site of HS-dependent herpesvirus uptake.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 19 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 19 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 26%
Researcher 4 21%
Professor 3 16%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 11%
Student > Master 2 11%
Other 3 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 32%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 21%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 16%
Neuroscience 2 11%
Unspecified 2 11%
Other 2 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 September 2018.
All research outputs
#3,384,328
of 12,236,571 outputs
Outputs from PLoS Pathogens
#3,417
of 5,824 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#79,165
of 280,281 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS Pathogens
#88
of 175 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,236,571 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 71st percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,824 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.8. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 280,281 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 175 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.